Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

This question already has an answer here:

I always thought that enum hashCode was referring to ordinal in Java, since ordinal seems to be a perfect candidate for hashCode, but it turns out it enum hashCode actually refers to default hashCode object implementation.

I understand, that this does not contradict JLS, but still this came to me as a surprise, and I can't think why it was made this way. Although I guess JVM, could have relied on this somehow to provide unique guarantees, but this does not hold anymore for 64 bit JVM.

I've checked in JDK 1.6, and latest JDK 7, and this is the same way in both.

Does any one know reason why, it was made this way?

It makes a perfect sense to use ordinal as a hashCode, since it satisfies all the credentials needed plus it is even consistent from one JVM start to the other, which is not required, but nice thing to have.

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by EJP, NimChimpsky, Kev Mar 9 '13 at 11:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Unless you happen to get a response from a JDK author the answer is basically 'no'. Not real question. –  EJP Mar 6 '13 at 8:54
    
@EJP I don't think you need a jdk author to understand the difference between hashcode and enum ordinal. –  NimChimpsky Mar 6 '13 at 8:58
1  
I have a perfect understanding of difference betqween hashCode and ordinal, what I don't understand is why are they different in case of enum, it makes a perfect sense to use ordinal as a hashCode, since it satisfies all the credentials needed plus it is even consistent from one JVM start to the other, which is not required, but nice. –  mavarazy Mar 6 '13 at 10:00
1  
@anton_oparin "I have a perfect understanding of difference betqween hashCode and ordinal" you don't hence the question, and clear answers.Using ordinal would guarantee collisions, whereas hashcode implementations avoid them –  NimChimpsky Mar 6 '13 at 10:01
1  
@anton_oparin Ordinal is not unique!!! Look at the answer given by perception, the ordinal of both is 0, they are the first in each enum declaration –  NimChimpsky Mar 6 '13 at 10:15

2 Answers 2

Imagine this trivial, completely made up scenario:

interface MediaType {}

enum BookTypes implements MediaType {
    HARDCOVER;
}

enum MagazineTypes implements MediaType {
    MONTHLY;
}

Map<MediaType, MediaItem> itemMap = new HashMap<MediaType, MediaItem>();
itemMap.put(BookTypes.HARDCOVER, new Book());
itemMap.put(MagazineTypes.MONTHLY, new Magazine());

I think it's pretty clear why you wouldn't want to use ordinal as a hash code in this instance.

share|improve this answer
    
Since enum uses default hashCode, there can be cases, when the same enum used as key, gets in the same bucket in HashMap, this could happen randomly or systematically, depending on the structure of enum. So your point is not valid. –  mavarazy Mar 6 '13 at 9:53
2  
The chance for collisions is much higher using the ordinal as hash code, as opposed to using the default hash code, which is optimized and has very few collisions. My point is quite valid. –  Perception Mar 6 '13 at 9:57
    
much higher is an understatement, they are guaranteed. –  NimChimpsky Mar 6 '13 at 9:59
    
@NimChimpsky - well by the specification its not guaranteed. Though I have not seen an implementation in the wild yet that did not return unique hash codes for objects. It's definitely possible to run into conflicts in long running apps that use PRNG's to allocate hash codes. But in any case its still highly unlikely. –  Perception Mar 6 '13 at 10:07
    
@Perception I meant collisions would be guaranteed if ordinal is used –  NimChimpsky Mar 6 '13 at 10:13

hashcode and ordinal are completely different.

The first instance of every enum would have the same ordinal value, the opposite of a hashcode.

ordinal() Returns the ordinal of this enumeration constant (its position in its enum declaration, where the initial constant is assigned an ordinal of zero).

enum BookTypes implements MediaType {
    HARDCOVER;  //ordinal is 0
}

enum MagazineTypes implements MediaType {
    MONTHLY; //ordinal is 0
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is true, and as I am saying it does not contradict JLS, but, again, ordinal seems to be a perfect candidate for hashCode, and I can't think of the reason why it was not used as such. –  mavarazy Mar 6 '13 at 9:56
    
@anton_oparin you are totally missing the point, ordinal is not a perfect candidate at all, for the reason i put in my scond line, and also in the other answer. –  NimChimpsky Mar 6 '13 at 9:57
    
UNIQUE VALUE IS A PERFECT CANDIDATE FOR HASH CODE, ORDINAL IS UNIQUE FOR ENUM. One over fetched example does not make a case. –  mavarazy Mar 6 '13 at 10:25
1  
@anton_oparin its not an overfecthed example - its just two enums, I have about 25 in one of my apps. Using your method, their hashcodes would all collide, thus making the hashcode compeletely useless. Ordinal would be a perfect candidate for hashcode, if you can guarantee you only have one enum in your entire application, which would be stupid. –  NimChimpsky Mar 6 '13 at 10:38

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.