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Files will ship with bugs, and companies will always want to provide new features. There must be a way to distribute new files with the hope that the applications will work just fine. And if the application doesn't work fine, there has to be an easy way to restore the application to its last-known good state.

I know this will be general question but I think that is also a general problem.
Comparisons of the solution in different platforms will be amassing.

Dear friends,
Actually I am not talking about How to develop software,
Its about How to deploy software with minimum side effects on end users machine

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closed as not constructive by Denis Tulskiy, bdares, billz, dystroy, BЈовић Mar 6 '13 at 9:14

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2  
You should use test units ? –  dystroy Mar 6 '13 at 8:50
    
CVS and (unit) testing ? You can test your code and roll back whenever there is a regression you haven't detected in your tests. –  Geoffroy Mar 6 '13 at 8:52
1  
the word "tests" should be sufficient to answer this one. –  bdares Mar 6 '13 at 8:57
    
One problem in case of bugs is that the "last-known good state" might be the one with the bug - just not discovered yet. –  Bo Persson Mar 6 '13 at 9:27
    
Actually the question is not about How to develop software, Its about How to deploy software with minimum side effects on end users machine –  Mohsen Heydari Nov 19 '13 at 16:28

2 Answers 2

  1. (should be step 0, or -1) use a capable source code management tool, and use it to its full potential: especially branching)
  2. Test Driven Development - always have tests for what you can test, and design code to be testable (to the point it is feasible, of course.)
  3. never do any of these two the same time:
  4. use continuous integration wherever possible

Reverting to "last stable" release in case of emergency

This must be supported by some infrastructural decisions, like keeping around the last stable release compiled and ready to be redeployed if something goes awry despite the efforts (been there, done that)

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What about "easy way to restore the application to its last-known good state" –  Mohsen Heydari Mar 6 '13 at 8:58
    
@M.Heydari Given you use a good SCM, you can revert to any state in a pinch. If you use it correctly, the "last stable" is actually always the HEAD revision in the trunk... So just switch to that, and check out the latest - and you're at your starting point again. Of course, this must be supported by some infrastructural decisions, like keeping around the last stable release compiled and ready to be redeployed if something goes awry despite the efforts (been there, done that) –  ppeterka Mar 6 '13 at 9:01

You should do unit testing. That's a good solution to avoid regressions.

But you can't just fast make a change in a big application and build a test unit ensuring everything is OK. You have to make a bunch of test units.

Which is costly, but there is no cheap way to ensure an application is bug free. The only solution is to dedicate a lot of work to testing, be it using unit testing or human testers or both. There's emphasis on that point in Joel Test because a serious team must spend enough in testing.

Restoring an application to an old state is just having a good version control system and not a mess with configuration and data parts. Some VCS have tools to help you find when a bug occured, for example git bissect.

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Whats you opinion on "easy way to restore the application to its last-known good state" –  Mohsen Heydari Mar 6 '13 at 8:58
    
Simply use a good VCS, like git. –  dystroy Mar 6 '13 at 9:00
    
the question is about How to deploy software with minimum side effects on end users machine... –  Mohsen Heydari Nov 24 '13 at 12:31

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