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Here is the class I am seeking to test:

package math;
import java.lang.Math;
public class Power {

public double powerFinder (double x, double y) 
    {

        return Math.pow(5, 4);

    }

}

Here is the test:

@Test

public double testPower() {

    Power power = new Power();
    assertEquals("Result", 625, power.powerFinder(5, 4), epsilon);
}

}

At the moment I'm getting 'the method powerFinder(double) in the type Power is not applicable for the arguments (int,int). How do I solve this please, so the test will run?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You declare powerFinder (double x), so you need to pass one double argument, and not two ints.

Use:

power.powerFinder(5)

or change the method to be: powerFinder (double x, double y)

You can also change double to void in public double testPower() {

Your test function doesn't return any value, so you need to declare it as void return type.

I think you should read this

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I've done that, and am now getting 'this method must return a result of type double' for the test method. How do I solve this? Do I need to add an extra return statement? –  Michael Nares Mar 6 '13 at 9:40
    
Updated the answer –  BobTheBuilder Mar 6 '13 at 9:43
    
That's sorted it, many thanks. –  Michael Nares Mar 6 '13 at 9:52

Change your code to:

public double powerFinder (double x, double y); 
{

    return Math.pow(x, y);

}
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The problem is that the type double does not mean a pair of values, but a single piece of a double precision floating point number. Also, your method doesn't even use that single parameter.

So this:

public double powerFinder (double x) 
{
    return Math.pow(5, 4);
}

should be rewritten to:

public double powerFinder (double x, double y) 
{
    return Math.pow(x, y); // note x and y: those are the arguments of your function
}

But this in itself makes no sense, you could just use Math.pow(x, y) instead. Of course then your test would make no sense too...

(Similar constructs could make sense, to hide implementation details when dealing with an API, and provide an abstraction - but in this case this doesn't seem applicable...)

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