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I have a class with a private char str[256];

and for it I have an explicit constructor:

explicit myClass(const char *func)
{
    strcpy(str,func);
}

I call it as:

myClass obj("example");

When I compile this I get the following warning:

deprecated conversion from string constant to 'char*'

Why is this happening?

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1  
You should use strncpy(str, func, 255) instead of strcpy(str, func) for a safer copy. And then don't forget to add the '\0' at the end of the string since strncpy does not add it. –  Patrice Bernassola Oct 6 '09 at 8:55
1  
Safer still to say "strncpy(str, func, sizeof(str)); str[sizeof(str) - 1] = '\0';" –  Warren Young Oct 6 '09 at 8:59
3  
I don't think the above gives the warning you quoted, although I'm sure quite similar code would. In order to get meaningful answers, you should post a minimal, compiling example that produces the warning. –  sbi Oct 6 '09 at 9:23
2  
What compiler? Try to find the minimum lines that exhibit this behavior. –  peterchen Oct 6 '09 at 9:38
1  
The code you are showing doesn't exhibit the problem you are reporting, at least not with my compiler. You may also want to consider using std::string instead of the lower-level C library routines for string manipulation. –  Brian Neal Oct 6 '09 at 13:03

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Why is this happening? I think the most likely explanation is that you're looking in the wrong place. The code you showed doesn't require the conversion from string literal to char*. The warning must have come from some other place.

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The warning:

deprecated conversion from string constant to 'char*'

is given because you are doing somewhere (not in the code you posted) something like:

void foo(char* str);
foo("hello");

The problem is that you are trying to convert a string literal (with type const char[]) to char*.

You can convert a const char[] to const char* because the array decays to the pointer, but what you are doing is making a mutable a constant.

This conversion is probably allowed for C compatibility and just gives you the warning mentioned.

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2  
nice and easy explanation –  Michael Nguyen Apr 2 '13 at 6:25

As answer no. 2 by fnieto - Fernando Nieto clearly and correctly describes that this warning is given because somewhere in your code you are doing (not in the code you posted) something like:

void foo(char* str);
foo("hello");

However, if you want to keep your code warning-free as well then just make respective change in your code:

void foo(char* str);
foo((char *)"hello");

That is, simply cast the string constant to (char *).

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Alternatively, make the function: void foo(const char* str) –  Caprooja Apr 14 at 16:28
2  
@Caprooja Yes declaring the param as 'pointer to a constant' will also work in this case. But with this change user can no more change/reassign the value stored at the address using the 'str' pointer which user might be doing in the implementation part. So that is something you might want to look out for. –  sactiw Apr 15 at 7:37

In fact a string constant literal is neither a const char * nor a char* but a char[]. Its quite strange but written down in the c++ specifications; If you modify it the behavior is undefined because the compiler may store it in the code segment.

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1  
I would say it is const char[] because as a rvalue you cannot modify it. –  fnieto - Fernando Nieto Oct 6 '09 at 20:29
2  
@Brian, no. See 2.13.4/1 in 03 standard or 2.13.4/6 in 0x draft. "A narrow string literal has type “array of n const char”, where n is the size of the string as defined below, and has static storage duration". –  fnieto - Fernando Nieto Oct 7 '09 at 11:33

I solve this problem by adding this macro in the beginning of the code, somewhere. Or add it in <iostream>, hehe.

 #define C_TEXT( text ) ((char*)std::string( text ).c_str())
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There are 3 solutions:

Solution 1:

const char *x = "foo bar";

Solution 2:

char *x = (char *)"foo bar";

Solution 3:

char* x = (char*) malloc(strlen("foo bar"));
strcpy(x,"foo bar");

Arrays also can be used instead of pointers because an array is already a constant pointer.

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The following illustrates the solution, assign your string to a variable pointer to a constant array of char (a string is a constant pointer to a constant array of char - plus length info):

#include <iostream>

void Swap(const char * & left, const char * & right) {
    const char *const temp = left;
    left = right;
    right = temp;
}

int main() {
    const char * x = "Hello"; // These works because you are making a variable
    const char * y = "World"; // pointer to a constant string
    std::cout << "x = " << x << ", y = " << y << '\n';
    Swap(x, y);
    std::cout << "x = " << x << ", y = " << y << '\n';
}
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