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So I'm pretty new to Mathematica, and am trying to learn to solve problems in a functional way. The problem I was solving was to list the ways in which I could sum elements from a list (with repetitions), so the sum is leq to some value. The code below solves this just fine.

i = {7.25, 7.75, 15, 19, 22};
m = 22;
getSum[l_List, n_List] := Total[Thread[{l, n}] /. {x_, y_} -> x y];
t = Prepend[Map[Range[0, Floor[m/#]] &, i], List];
Outer @@ %;
Flatten[%, ArrayDepth[%] - 2];
Map[{#, getSum[i, #]} &, %];
DeleteCases[%, {_, x_} /; x > m || x == 0];
TableForm[Flatten /@ SortBy[%, Last], 0, 
 TableHeadings -> {None, Append[i, "Total"]}]

However, the code check a lot of unneccesary cases, which could be a problem if m is higher of the list is longer. My question is simply what would be the most Mathematica-esque way of solving this problem, concerning both efficiency and code elegancy.

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3  
Does not make much sense to cross-post here and on Mathematica.StackExchange - mostly the same people in both places, only most of us switched to that one. –  Leonid Shifrin Mar 6 '13 at 12:08

2 Answers 2

One simple though not optimal way is :

sol = Reduce[Dot[i, {a, b, c, d, e}] <= m, {a, b, c, d, e}, Integers];

at first try with a smaller i, say i = {7.25, 7.75} to get a feeling about whether you can use this.

You can improve speed by providing upper limits for the coefficients, like in

sol = Reduce[And @@ {Dot[i, {a, b, c, d, e}] <= m, 
                     Sequence @@ Thread[{a, b, c, d, e} <= Quotient[m, i]]}, 
        {a, b, c, d, e}, Integers]
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1  
I'd upvote, but your total rep looks so much better now than with 10 added. –  High Performance Mark Mar 6 '13 at 10:37
    
@HighPerformanceMark I must agree, I'll take the spiritual support. –  b.gatessucks Mar 6 '13 at 10:39
    
Very neat code indeed! However, it seems to be incredibly slow compared to my solution, which was what I wanted to improve! –  maestron Mar 6 '13 at 11:36
    
Ahh, someone else spoiled the elegance of your rep, so I'm upvoting now. –  High Performance Mark Mar 9 '13 at 9:42
    
@HighPerformanceMark You could restore the old nice number ! –  b.gatessucks Mar 9 '13 at 9:59

How about

recurr[numbers_, boundary_] :=

  Reap[memoryRecurr[0, {}, numbers, boundary]][[2, 1]];

memoryRecurr[_, _, {}, _] := Null;

memoryRecurr[sum_, numbers_, restNumbers_, diff_] :=
  (
   Block[
     {presentNumber = First[restNumbers], restRest = Rest[restNumbers]}
     ,
     If[
      presentNumber <= diff
      ,
      Block[{
        newNumbers = Append[numbers, presentNumber],
        newSum = sum + presentNumber
        },
       Sow[{newNumbers, newSum}];

       memoryRecurr[
        newSum,
        newNumbers,
        restRest,
        diff - presentNumber
        ];
       ]
      ];
     memoryRecurr[sum, numbers, restRest, diff]
     ];

   );

So that

recurr[{1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, 7]

->

{{{1}, 1}, {{1, 2}, 3}, {{1, 2, 3}, 6}, {{1, 2, 4}, 7}, {{1, 3}, 
  4}, {{1, 4}, 5}, {{1, 5}, 6}, {{2}, 2}, {{2, 3}, 5}, {{2, 4}, 
  6}, {{2, 5}, 7}, {{3}, 3}, {{3, 4}, 7}, {{4}, 4}, {{5}, 5}}
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