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The Enumeration interface of java has 2 methods

  1. hasNext()
  2. next()

Why doesn't Iterator extend Enumeration and add the remove method()?

Also, if all I want to do is loop over my collection, I can make do with an Enumeration (or an iterator if it extends enumeration) as loop statements only need an enumeration. I don't have to worry about the collection getting modified

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I think you meant, why doesn't Enumeration extend from Iterator - as Iterator already has the remove() method. –  R.J Mar 6 '13 at 10:36
    
Enumeration does not have the two methods you describe. Instead, it has hasMoreElements() and nextElement(). See the API docs. –  Jesper Mar 6 '13 at 10:46

3 Answers 3

Why doesn't Iterator extend Enumeration and add the remove() method?

From the documentation:

Iterator takes the place of Enumeration in the Java Collections Framework. Iterators differ from enumerations in two ways:

  • Iterators allow the caller to remove elements from the underlying collection during the iteration with well-defined semantics.
  • Method names have been improved.

I suspect the latter is the real reason for introducing a brand new interface instead of extending the existing one.

Also, if all I want to do is loop over my collection, I can make do with an Enumeration (or an iterator if it extends enumeration) as loop statements only need an enumeration. I don't have to worry about the collection getting modified

Well, if you don't want to modify the collection, then don't call remove(). If you really, really don't trust yourself, you could use Collections.unmodifiableCollection() et al to create a read-only wrapper.

Finally, it is worth noting that if you use a for-each loop to iterate over the collection, you don't have access to the remove() method anyway:

for (String s : str_list) {
   ...
}

Here, we are using the Iterator interface, but don't have access to the actual iterator object.

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You could just obtain a java.util.Enumerator from your collection, via the java.util.Collections.enumeration() Method.

Anyway, if you don't want to modify your collection via its iterator, it's just a matter of not calling the remove() method.

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According to http://www.journaldev.com/1330/java-collections-interview-questions-and-answers#iterator-vs-enumeration, "Enumeration is twice as fast as Iterator and uses very less memory. Enumeration is very basic and fits to basic needs."

So, I guess if you don't need remove(), then using Enumeration is more effective than using Iterator.

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