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I am doing yet another euler project question (38). I have this function which returns a list of numbers but what I need is that list of numbers to be one number. It calculates the concatenated product of an integer.

f (a,b) = a*b
conProInt x n  = map f (zip (replicate n x) ([1..n]))

prob38 = maximum [ (conProInt (x) (n)) | x <- [100..500], n <- [1..9], (sort $ nub $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n) )) == (sort $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n) )), (sort $ nub $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n))) == [1..9] ]

eg:

conProInt 192 3

returns: [192,384,576]

what I need returned is: 192384576

I have searched around and can't find a function or think of a function I could construct that would deliver what I need. How would I go about this?

EDIT:

I have updated the script to incorporate faster concatenation, but it doesn't return the correct result:

f (a,b) = a*b
conProInt x n  =( combine (map f (zip (replicate n x) ([1..n]))))
prob38 = maximum [ (conProInt (x) (n)) | x <- [1..50000], n <- [2..40], (sort $ nub $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n) )) == (sort $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n) )), (sort $ nub $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n))) == [1..9] ]

I'm pretty sure the pandigital test:

(sort $ nub $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n) )) == (sort $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n) )), (sort $ nub $ (decToList $ (conProInt x n))) == [1..9]

won't fail and I tried to make the search as large as possible but the maximum 9-pandigital I got was 986315724, any suggestions? Is the range of values for n a very large one?

share|improve this question
    
map f $ zip (replicate n x) [1..n] == map f $ zip (repeat x) [1..n] == zipWith (f x) [1..n], and your pandigital test could be shortened to sort (decToList $ conProInt x n) == [1..9]. Your bounds are actually a bit too wide (n>9 makes no sense and given n you can narrow the range of x) but really you should try to figure out how you managed to produce 986315724: it's not actually a concatenated product of an integer with [1..n]. Possibly your combine or decToList is still wrong. –  ephemient Oct 9 '09 at 15:08
    
Could it be that Haskell is getting confused with the large numbers and the use of Int. But it doesn't like it when I try to change the classes to Integer. I'll have to look further into functions that use Integer. –  Jonno_FTW Oct 10 '09 at 4:31
    
The length et al. set of functions return Int, thus doing mixing them into your arithmetic requires everything to be typed Int. Your options are to use Data.List.genericLength et al. which return a generic Num instance, or to use toInteger which... well, the name is pretty obvious. That being said, 987654321 only requires 30 bits to represent and should fit into an Int just fine, so that's unlikely to be your problem. –  ephemient Oct 11 '09 at 15:51
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Going via Strings is probably easiest:

read $ concat $ map (show) [192,384,576]

Though you'll probably need to add a type signature:

Prelude> (read $ concat $ map (show) [192,384,576]) :: Int
192384576
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but now I am getting some rather strange behaviour. On typing conProInt 93 5 as a sample, it returned the answer: -1626048847. What could be the cause? –  Jonno_FTW Oct 6 '09 at 10:40
1  
@Jonno: Integer overflow. 32-bit integers — even unsigned ones — can only represent numbers in the low billions. The result of that function is much higher. –  Chuck Oct 6 '09 at 17:45
2  
@Jonno: If Int is too small, try using Integer instead. Or, if you want to make it a function, any type in Num will work: concatDigits :: (Num m, Show m, Num n, Read n) => [m] -> n concatDigits = read . concat . map (show) –  thsutton Oct 7 '09 at 1:24
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You can use this function to concatenate a list of numbers:

concatNumbers :: [Int] -> String
concatNumbers = concat . map show

If you want the function to return the concatenation as a number, you can use read.

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4  
concat . map = concatMap, no? –  Chuck Oct 6 '09 at 9:41
1  
Or heck, even concatNumbers = (>>= show) would work :) –  ephemient Oct 6 '09 at 20:21
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Here's an example of how to concatenate digits without converting to and from character strings.

-- foldl1' is a strict fold.  "foldl1" would also work...
import Data.List (foldl1')    

-- Combine two numbers such that their digits are concatenated.
-- op 1 23 = 123, op 0 12 = 12, op 12345 67 = 1234567
op :: Int -> Int -> Int
op a b = a * power 10 (numDigits b) + b

-- How many digits does a positive number have?
numDigits :: Int -> Int
numDigits x = length . takeWhile (>= 1) . iterate (`div` 10) $ x

-- Take a positive number and raise it to a positive power.
-- power 5 2 = 25, power 10 3 = 1000
power :: Int -> Int -> Int
power x y = foldl1' (*) . take y $ repeat x

-- Take a list of numbers, and concatenate all their digits.
combine :: [Int] -> Int
combine xs = foldl1' op xs

example run:

Prelude> :m +Data.List
Prelude Data.List> let power x y = foldl1' (*) . take y $ repeat x
Prelude Data.List> let numDigits = length . takeWhile (>=1) . iterate (`div` 10)
Prelude Data.List> let op a b = a * power 10 (numDigits b) + b
Prelude Data.List> let combine xs = foldl1' op xs
Prelude Data.List> combine [192, 384, 576]
192384576
Prelude Data.List>
share|improve this answer
    
That assumes numbers between 100 and 999, actually. Which, luckily, should be the case when solving Project Euler problem 38, but still... –  ephemient Oct 7 '09 at 3:22
    
ephemient: You're right. He asked for concatenation, and I gave him a way to combine digits representing different 'places' (millions, thousands, etc.) instead. It's been rewritten to concatenate any list of positive Ints. –  Michael Steele Oct 7 '09 at 15:55
    
power = (^), and I'd personally write numDigits x = fromJust $ findIndex (> x) $ iterate (*10) 1 because integer multiplication is faster than integer division, but now I'm just nitpicking :) –  ephemient Oct 7 '09 at 20:02
    
(^) is good to know about. It's defined in GHC.Real, which for some reason doesn't appear at haskell.org/ghc/docs/latest/html/libraries/index.html. Now I can stop writing that by hand all over the place. Both of our numDigits are pretty inefficient since they generate a list to do their work. –  Michael Steele Oct 7 '09 at 20:22
2  
I posted some benchmarks at blog.michaelsteele.us/2009/10/optimization-with-criterion –  Michael Steele Oct 8 '09 at 3:41
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