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I am working on a Java web application that is many years old.

Most of the <bean:write>s in the JSPs have filter="false" even when it isn't needed, probably because of developers blindly copying existing code. <bean:write> is the Struts tag to output a JSP variable, and when filter="false" is specified it does not do HTML escaping (so filter="false" is similar to the <c:out> attribute escapeXml="false"). This means that the application is vulnerable to XSS attacks, because some of these <bean:write filter="false">s are outputting user input.

A blanket removal of filter="false" isn't an option because in some cases the application allows the user to enter HTML using a TinyMCE text area, so we do need to output raw HTML in some cases to retain the user-entered formatting (although we should still be sanitising user-entered HTML to remove scripts).

There are thousands of filter="false"s in the code so an audit of each one to work out whether it is required would take too long.

What we are thinking of doing is making our own version of the bean:write tag, say secure:write, and doing a global find/replace of bean:write with secure:write in our JSPs. secure:write will strip scripts from the output when filter="false" is specified. After this change users would still be able to cause formatting HTML to be output where they shouldn't really be able to, but we aren't worried about that for the time being as long as the XSS vulnerabilities are fixed.

We would like to use a library to implement the script-stripping in the secure:write tag and we have been looking at https://www.owasp.org/index.php/Category:OWASP_AntiSamy_Project and https://code.google.com/p/owasp-java-html-sanitizer/. Both look like they are capable of sanitising HTML, although AntiSamy looks like it is intended to be used to sanitise HTML on the way in to the application instead of on the way out, and since data is output more often than it is input we are concerned that running all of our secure:write output through it could be slow.

I have 2 main questions:

1) Will our proposed approach work to fix the XSS vulnerabilities caused by filter="false"?

2) Can anyone recommend a library to use for HTML sanitisation when displaying content, i.e. which is fast enough to not significantly affect the page-rendering performance? Has anyone used AntiSamy or owasp-java-html-sanitizer for something similar?

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1) Will our proposed approach work to fix the XSS vulnerabilities caused by filter="false"?

This definitely sounds like an improvement that will reduce your attack surface, but it's not sufficient. Once an attacker can no longer inject <script>doEvil()</script> they will then focus on injecting javascript:doEvil() where URLs are expected, so you will need to harden places where URLs are injected as well.

If you're using an XSS scanner, I would do what you describe, then rerun your scanners, making sure that it tests for injected javascript URLs.

Once URLs are locked down, you should audit any writes into style attributes or elements and event handler attributes.

2) Can anyone recommend a library to use for HTML sanitisation when displaying content, i.e. which is fast enough to not significantly affect the page-rendering performance? Has anyone used AntiSamy or owasp-java-html-sanitizer for something similar?

Shameless plug: https://code.google.com/p/owasp-java-html-sanitizer/

A fast and easy to configure HTML Sanitizer written in Java which lets you include HTML authored by third-parties in your web application while protecting against XSS.

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We've gone for owasp-java-html-sanitizer :-) Very impressed with the out of box experience - make benchamrk and make runtests worked without me even having to configure any settings! We're using a policy based on the eBay one, because we want to allow most HTML through. Thanks for your advice on other potential vulnerabilities. –  frankoid Mar 27 '13 at 16:11
    
@frankoid, I'm glad you like it. Incidentally, html-contextual-autoescaper-java aims to do context-inference and sanitizer picking. It's running live in Google Apps Scripts and I have a hacked-up version of Jasper that integrates it, but it's not a drop-in replacement yet for JSPs. –  Mike Samuel Mar 27 '13 at 18:20
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