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How to reorder columns of a data.frame on the total amount of unique values per column? As an example:

var1 var2 var3
  1    1   1
  0    2   2
  1    3   3
  0    4   1
  1    5   2

Is there a way to reorder this like var2, var3, var1 automatically (because the length of unique values are 5, 3 and 2 respectively, or the opposite, 2 3 5)?

In this case it is not that difficult to get what we want, but in my case I've many columns. Is there a way to do this type of sorting automatically?

Also, I'd prefer to have a solution that works on matrix (in addition to data.frame), independent of whether there are column names or not.

share|improve this question
    
Are you asking about reordering columns or sorting them? – Arun Mar 6 '13 at 11:05
    
Reordening columns, I'll update. – PascalvKooten Mar 6 '13 at 11:06
    
Dualinity, I've edited the post to clarify somethings. – Arun Mar 6 '13 at 11:23
    
Thank you, you made it into a more general, appropriate question. – PascalvKooten Mar 6 '13 at 11:57
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Something like this?

df[names(sort(sapply(df, function(x) length(unique(x))), decreasing = TRUE))]

#   var2 var3 var1
# 1    1    1    1
# 2    2    2    0
# 3    3    3    1
# 4    4    1    0
# 5    5    2    1

If your input is a matrix, then:

m[, names(sort(apply(m, 2, function(x) 
       length(unique(x))), decreasing = TRUE))] 

should work.

#      var2 var3 var1
# [1,]    1    1    1
# [2,]    2    2    0
# [3,]    3    3    1
# [4,]    4    1    0
# [5,]    5    2    1

Edit: your example in the post seems to have column names, but this one you gave in your comments doesn't. Please make sure to produce the example correctly.

X <- cbind(1, rnorm(10), 1:10)

Since you can't expect column names, you'll have to return indices. Try this (it'll work if you've column names or not, of course):

m[, sort(apply(X, 2, function(x) 
         length(unique(x))), decreasing = TRUE, index.return = TRUE)$ix]
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 Argh, beat you by 16 seconds, but not with the good answer ! – juba Mar 6 '13 at 11:08
1  
+1 too too fast – alexwhan Mar 6 '13 at 11:08
    
I think that this is the answer juba... – PascalvKooten Mar 6 '13 at 11:08
    
This does not work on matrices? – PascalvKooten Mar 6 '13 at 11:09
    
@Dualinity, please check edit. – Arun Mar 6 '13 at 11:12

Another solution using order,

dat[,order(apply(dat,2,function(x) length(unique(x))),decreasing = TRUE)]
  var2 var3 var1
1    1    1    1
2    2    2    0
3    3    3    1
4    4    1    0
5    5    2    1

Now if we put remove colnames, we stille get the good result but with a warning

 colnames(dat) <- NULL
 dat[,order(apply(dat,2,function(x) length(unique(x))),decreasing = TRUE)]
  NA NA NA
1  1  1  1
2  2  2  0
3  3  3  1
4  4  1  0
5  5  2  1

EDIT test performance:

I test on a matrix with 1000 columns. the 2 solutions times are comparable, with a slight gain for order.

X <- matrix(rnorm(100*1000),ncol=1000,nrow=100)
Arun <- function() X[, sort(apply(X, 2, function(x) 
  length(unique(x))), decreasing = TRUE, index.return = TRUE)$ix]

AgStudy <- function()  X[,order(apply(X,2,function(x) length(unique(x))),decreasing = TRUE)]

library(microbenchmark)

microbenchmark(Arun(),AgStudy())

Unit: milliseconds
       expr      min       lq   median       uq      max
1 AgStudy() 28.04634 32.37105 34.73820 36.49930 129.6048
2    Arun() 31.15476 32.97180 36.24027 37.91584 132.3871
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