Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm pretty new in using Perl and I need to use it to compare all the lines of a file. The file has two IDs separated by | and a value for each ID pair. It looks like this:

a|b 9
a|a 1
a|c 4
s|c 3
f|e NA
a|d 2
d|a 2
d|b 5
c|l NA
c|s 3

I would like to eliminate a row if there is another with the same IDs (letters), but in an inverted order (like a|d and d|a), the rows in which I have "NA" as value and the rows with the same ID in both positions (like a|a 1). From the example here, I would like to obtain an output like this:

a|b 9
a|c 4
s|c 3
a|d 2
d|b 5

I'm trying a code that I wrote. It is able to eliminate the rows with "NA" and the rows in which the IDs are the same (like a|a 1), but it is not able to detect the rows with the inverted IDs.

$file = "test.txt";
open (HAN, "$file") || die "No input file";
@r = <HAN>;
close (HAN);
for ($i=0; $i<=$#r; $i++) {
    chomp($r[$i]);      
    ($id, $v) = split (/\t/, $r[$i]);
    if ( $v ne NA ) {
       ($id1, $id2) = split (/\|/, $id);            
        $ii = $id1."|".$id2;
        $dd = $id2."|".$id1;
        if(($id1 ne $id2)||($ii ne $dd)){
           print "$id\t$v\n";
        }
    }       
}

Any help is absolutely welcome!

Thank you in advance, Gab

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Just another approach, in case the previous 2 responses confuse you:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

my %previous;
open (my $IN,'<','file.txt') or die "$!";
while (<$IN>) {
    my ($tmp,$v)=split/ /;
    next if $v=~/NA/; #remove the rows in which I have "NA" as value 
    my ($id1,$id2)=split/\|/,$tmp;
    next if $id1 eq $id2; #remove the rows with the same ID in both positions
    next if exists $previous{"$id2|$id1"}; #remove the row if there is another with the same IDs (letters), but in an inverted order
    $previous{$tmp}=1;
    print;
}
close $IN;
share|improve this answer
    
thank you...very simple and clear explanations! –  Gabelins Mar 11 '13 at 12:49
add comment

To solve the problem, you need to keep track of all the pairs (of IDs) encountered so far. When ever a new line is processed, it needs to be matched with the list of ID pairs to find if it is an inverted pair.

The following modifications make it work:

$file = "test.txt";
open (HAN, "$file") || die "No input file";
@r = <HAN>;
@encountered;
close (HAN);
for ($i=0; $i<=$#r; $i++) {
    chomp($r[$i]);
    $present=0;
    $invertPr=0;
    ($id, $v) = split (/\t/, $r[$i]);
    if ( $v ne NA ) {
       ($id1, $id2) = split (/\|/, $id);
        if($id1 eq $id2) {
            next;
        }
        for($j = 0; $j < $#encountered; $j+=2) {
            if($encountered[$j] eq $id1 && $encountered[$j+1] eq $id2) {
                $present = 1;
            }
            if($encountered[$j+1] eq $id1 && $encountered[$j] eq $id2) {
                $invertPr = 1;
            }
        }
        if($present == 0) {
           push(@encountered, $id1);
           push(@encountered, $id2);
        }
        if($invertPr == 0) {
           print "$id\t$v\n";
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

The following script always uses the 'lower' id as the first part of the key. Therefore, you do not have to care about inverted ids:

 #!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

sub compare {
    my %result;
    for (@_) {
        my ($id1, $id2, $value) = /(.+)\|(.+) (.+)/;
        next if $id1 eq $id2 or 'NA' eq $value;
        ($id1, $id2) = sort $id1, $id2;
        next if exists $result{"$id1|$id2"};
        $result{"$id1|$id2"} = $value;
    }
    return join "\n", map "$_ $result{$_}", keys %result;
}

print compare(<DATA>);

__DATA__
a|b 9
a|a 1
a|c 4
s|c 3
f|e NA
a|d 2
d|a 2
d|b 5
c|l NA
c|s 3
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry...I don't understand your code... :( –  Gabelins Mar 6 '13 at 11:53
    
@Gabelins: Sorry, simplified. –  choroba Mar 6 '13 at 12:06
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.