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I have a matrix in the following form

[,1]   [,2]   [,3]   [,4]   [,5]   [,6]   [,7]   [,8]   [,9]  [,10]  [,11]
   1     1     3      2      3       1      1     2      3       3      2

and following is my desired output (combining the column numbers, having same values).

a<-1,2,6,7
b<-3,5,9,10
c<-4,8,11

Elisa

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Whenever you name objects a,b,c or obj1, obj2 etc. you have essentially created a fake list which is much harder to work with than a real one. –  Backlin Mar 6 '13 at 13:31
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4 Answers 4

The following gives you a list which should be enough:

aList <- setNames(split(seq_along(mat), mat), unique(letters[mat]))
aList
#  $a
# [1] 1 2 6 7
#
# $c
# [1]  4  8 11
# 
# $b
# [1]  3  5  9 10

But if you really need variables in your environment, you can then do:

attach(aList)
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(+1) for slightly more elegant solution –  adibender Mar 6 '13 at 12:12
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m1 <-  matrix(c(1, 1, 3, 2, 3, 1, 1, 2, 3, 3, 2), nrow = 1)
split(seq_len(ncol(m1)), m1[1, ])

gives you a list with the desired elements. I assume you don't really want to create vectors a, b and c

split(seq_len(ncol(m1)), m1[1, ])

$`1`
[1] 1 2 6 7

$`2`
[1]  4  8 11

$`3`
[1]  3  5  9 10
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Your question is a bit odd and I suspect you are missing a few details. To get exactly what you want is a bit clunky. First generate some data:

##Some data
R> m = matrix(sample(1:3, 10, replace=T), ncol=10)
R> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9] [,10]
[1,]    1    2    2    3    1    3    3    2    2     1

Then pick out the unique values:

R> v = unique(m[1,])

now create you vectors as needed:

R> (a = which(v[1]==m[1,]))
[1]  1  5 10
R> (b = which(v[2]==m[1,]))
[1] 2 3 8 9
R> (c = which(v[3]==m[1,]))
[1] 4 6 7

However this isn't scalable (or elegant). If you have more than a couple of values, you will want to iterate over v, so something like:

(l = sapply(v, function(i) which(m[1, ] == i)))

The variable l is a list. To access the individual elements, use

l[[1]]
l[[2]]
l[[3]]
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You can use by to group by duplicated elements and return their rownames.

tab <- read.table(text ='[,1]   [,2]   [,3]   [,4]   [,5]   [,6]   [,7]   [,8]   [,9]  [,10]  [,11]
   1     1     3      2      3       1      1     2      3       3      2',head=T)

x <- t(tab)
by(x,x,FUN=rownames)
INDICES: 1
[1] "X..1." "X..2." "X..6." "X..7."
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INDICES: 2
[1] "X..4."  "X..8."  "X..11."
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INDICES: 3
[1] "X..3."  "X..5."  "X..9."  "X..10."

EDIT prettier output

rownames(x) <- 1:nrow(x)
> by(x,x,FUN=rownames)
INDICES: 1
[1] "1" "2" "6" "7"
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INDICES: 2
[1] "4"  "8"  "11"
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 
INDICES: 3
[1] "3"  "5"  "9"  "10"
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