Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
"-dhello;-egoodbye;-lcul8r" -replace "-d.*;","-dbonjour;"

gives:

-dbonjour;-lcul8r

Is it possible to not have it get rid of goodbye?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You should make the matching lazy using ?.

Use:

"-dhello;-egoodbye;-lcul8r" -replace "-d.*?;","-dbonjour;"
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I was looking for, thank you! –  muhmud Mar 6 '13 at 12:13

Always be explicit. .* matches everything it can (including the semicolon and all that follows), but you only want to match until the next semicolon, so just tell the regex engine that:

"-dhello;-egoodbye;-lcul8r" -replace "-d[^;]*;","-dbonjour;"

[^;] matches any character except semicolon.

share|improve this answer
    
Though this works in this case, it was just an example. I was really looking for a switch to turn off greediness. But, thanks, it's still useful advice. –  muhmud Mar 6 '13 at 12:15
    
@muhmud: Sure. I just wanted to express that ungreedy does not necessarily mean "the shortest possible match". You get that only when you specify exactly what the match contents may be. For example <.*?> will match <baz <foo> in "<baz <foo> bam>". –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 6 '13 at 12:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.