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so this is some code

var name = 'ali';

function say() {
  alert(name);
}

so this will alert 'ali' as name function is owned by global object now the following code

var oobj  { 
  var name: 'raziq',
  say:function () {
    alert (name);
  }
}

oobj.say();

so now the say function is owned by oobj object so the name property should alert 'raziq' instead of 'ali'. by the way i know the use of this keyword

my question is what will be alerted and y ?

share|improve this question
    
oops sorry about the typos –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 14:19
    
What is the question? –  Jeff Shaver Mar 6 '13 at 14:20
2  
the second example contains invalid syntax. also you should avoid variables which have the same name as named functions in the same scope. –  sdepold Mar 6 '13 at 14:21
    
so the name property should alert 'raziq' instead of 'ali'. –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 14:21
    
in oobj object because function belongs to oobj –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 14:22

3 Answers 3

---Update---

Basically, one is a variable and one is a property. You access them two different ways

In your question, you declare a variable name and a function. at any point, if you do not specifically redefine name then it will always be that value.

In your case, you think you are redefining name when you do

var oobj = {
    name: 'raziq'

but you aren't. You are declaring a property of the oobj object. i.e. if i try to alert name from outside the object, it will look to find a variable declaration of name and it will find the global variable that you set to 'ali'. In order to get to property name, you have to tell it the "path" to find it. The path is oobj.name

You are inside an object, so you don;t use var = and ;. You use a comma , and you just do say: function() {

var oobj = {
    name: 'raziq',
    say: function () {
        alert(this.name);
    }
}
oobj.say();
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for bothering to format your code correctly. –  Niet the Dark Absol Mar 6 '13 at 14:27
    
sorry about that i have corrected it. –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 14:35
    
just read my question again pls –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 15:01
    
Updated to try and explain. Does that help? –  Jeff Shaver Mar 6 '13 at 15:10
    
yea to some extend but my question is when i alert the name property in oobj object it should alert 'raziq' because i am inside the object and the function also belongs to object –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 15:16

As Jeff has already posted the right answer, I just wanted to point out, that even the first example is not working as intended. The inner alert will show you the name function.

So this:

function name() {
  alert(name);
}

name()

Will alert the message:

function name() {
  alert(name);
}
share|improve this answer

Maybe you are looking for this

var oobj = { 
    name : 'raziq',
    say : function (){
            alert (oobj.name);
        }
}

oobj.say();

See an updated fiddle example and an extended fiddle example.

share|improve this answer
    
yes but why should we indicate the oobj.name when the function is owned by that object –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 14:28
1  
because name is a parameter of oobj object. You can also use this.name instead of oobj.name –  Alexander V.B. Mar 6 '13 at 14:29
    
ok but the function is also a part of oobj object. –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 14:31
    
when it is a part of oobj object why should we care about "this" and the name of the oobj any way –  Abdul Raziq Mar 6 '13 at 14:32
    
Here is something (very) useful to know in this case robertnyman.com/2008/10/09/… (Using scope & closures in javascript) –  Alexander V.B. Mar 6 '13 at 14:36

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