Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C# spec 4.0 section 7.15.5.1:

Note that unlike an uncaptured variable, a captured local variable can be simulataneously exposed to multiple threads of execution.

What exactly does it mean by "multiple threads of execution"? Does this mean multiple threads, multiple execution paths or something else?

E.G.

        private static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Action[] result = new Action[3];
            int x;
            for (int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
            {
                //int x = i * 2 + 1;//this behaves more intuitively.  Outputs 1,3,5
                x = i*2 + 1;
                result[i] = () => { Console.WriteLine(x); };
            }
            foreach (var a in result)
            {
                a(); //outputs 5 each time
            }

            //OR...

            int y = 1;            
            Action one = new Action(() =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine(y);//Outputs 1
                y = 2;                
            });

            Action two = new Action(() =>
            {
                Console.WriteLine(y);//Outputs 2.  Working with same Y
            });

            var t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(one);
            t1.Wait();
            Task.Factory.StartNew(two);
            Console.Read();
        }

Here x exhibits different behavior based upon where x is declared. In the case of y the same variable is captured and used by multiple threads, but IMO this behavior is intuitive.

What are they referring to?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

"Multiple threads of execution" just means multiple threads; i.e., multiple threads that are executing concurrently. If a particular variable is exposed to multiple threads, any of those threads can read and write that variable's value.

This is potentially dangerous and should be avoided whenever possible. One possibility to avoid this, if your scenario allows, is to create local copies of variables in your tasks' methods.

share|improve this answer

If you modify the second part of your code a little:

        int y = 1;
        Action one = new Action(() =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine(y);//Outputs 1
            y = 2;
        });

        Action two = new Action(() =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine(y);//Outputs 2.  Working with same Y
            y = 1;
        });

        var t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(one);
        t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(two);
        t1.Wait();
        t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(one);
        t1.Wait();
        t1 = Task.Factory.StartNew(two);

        Console.Read();

Run it a few times or put it in a loop. It will output different, seemingly random, results, e.g. 1 1 1 2 or 1 2 1 2.

Multiple threads are accessing the same variable and getting and setting it simultaneously, which may give unexpected results.

share|improve this answer

Refer to the link below.

A reference to the outer variable n is said to be captured when the delegate is created. Unlike local variables, the lifetime of a captured variable extends until the delegates that reference the anonymous methods are eligible for garbage collection.

In other words the variable's memory location is captured when the method is created and then shared to that method. Just like if a thread had access to that variable minus the anonymous method. There is a compiler warning that will occur in some cases that it will suggest you move to a local temp variable to not cause unintended consequences.

MSDN Anonymous Methods

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.