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I have my own Object, and I'd like to extend it, saving data from a person and adding new info.

So the code would be:

public class Student : Person
{
    public string code { get; set; }
}

but when I try to init it and add the new value:

Person person = new Person("Paul", "Catch");
Student student = (Person)person;
student.code = "1234";

I got System.InvalidCastException: Unable to cast object of type 'MyLayer.Person' to type 'Student'.

Am I missing some point?

EDIT: maybe I wrong putting that Person class. You must suppose it become from a DB as object, such as Person person = new MyPersons().First();

So I won't to populate the new one with properties one by one, just extend one property thanks to the new object that extend the old one.

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closed as too localized by Michael Edenfield, Stony, A.V, billz, Raghav Sood Mar 7 '13 at 8:23

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Show us Person class.. –  Soner Gönül Mar 6 '13 at 15:21
    
Please show the definition of class Person. –  bash.d Mar 6 '13 at 15:21
    
I can't! It is not "Person" in fact, it's another class in a DLL, but this shouldn't important? –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 15:22
1  
person is being explicitly cast as Person then implicitly cast to Student (During the = assignment). I believe you meant to explicitly cast straight to Student –  Basic Mar 6 '13 at 15:24
1  
A Student is a Person but the opposite is not necessarily true - a Person is not always a Student. That is why your cast is failing. –  Jay Walker Mar 6 '13 at 15:28

5 Answers 5

You cannot convert a Person to Student directly.

Inheritance in OOP comes with hierarchy level, i.e. you can cast the derived class to base class, but the opposite is not possible. You cannot cast base class to derived class

One possible solution is :

Create Student from Person using constructor overload.

public class Person
{
    public string FName { get; set; }
    public string LName { get; set; }

    public Person(string fname, string lname)
    {
        FName = fname;
        LName = lname;
    }
}

public class Student : Person
{
    public Student(Person person, string code)
        : base(person.FName, person.LName)
    {
        this.code = code;
    }
    public Student(Person person)
        : base(person.FName, person.LName)
    {

    }


    public string code { get; set; }
}



static class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Person person = new Person("Paul", "Catch");

        // create new student from person using 
        Student student = new Student(person, "1234"); 
        //or
        Student student1 = new Student(person);
        student.code = "5678";


        Console.WriteLine(student.code); // = 1234
        Console.WriteLine(student1.code); // = 5678


    }
}
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Yes, you need to use a copy constructor like this to create a new instance of Student from a Person. You can't extend Person. –  Jay Walker Mar 6 '13 at 15:37
    
can I use a "generic" base? Because Person come with more than 20 properties...which is terrible write ALL –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 15:45
    
@paizza - and how can Generic help you to deal with 20 properties? –  PaRiMaL RaJ Mar 6 '13 at 15:47
    
@paizza - Generic is much like creating Template, even if you use generics you have to deal with 20 properties. –  PaRiMaL RaJ Mar 6 '13 at 15:48
    
I mean, extend "ALL" there is in the extended class... –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 15:53

Assign a Student to your Person.

Person person = new Student("Paul", "Catch");
Student student = (Person)person;
student.code = "1234";

Note that this makes all the casting pretty useless, better is:

Student student = new Student("Paul", "Catch");
student.code = "1234";
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But I must to start having an istance of Person, not of student :) –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 15:25
    
Your cast needs to be to Student, not Person. –  Servy Mar 6 '13 at 15:31

Your conversion is incorrect, a person can become a student (Not the other way round)

Change to:

Student student = (Student)person;

Although your type cast can be avoided ..

Person person = new Person("Paul", "Catch");
Student student = (Person)person;
student.code = "1234";

Becomes ....

Student student = new Student("Paul", "Catch");
student.code = "1234";
share|improve this answer
    
as I said, I got the same error –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 15:28
    
Yes man, but I don't create "Person", I already have it (it become with more than 20 properties, so I want create a new one copy them one by one). I just need to "extend" 1 properties in a class –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 15:31

In your Student class, add this constructor, assuming you have a constructor that takes two strings in the Person class

public Student(string val1, string val2) : base(val1, val2) { }

then you can use it like this

Student student = new Student("Paul", "Catch");
student.code = "1234";
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The problem you're seeing is that in your assignment, you're trying to downcast Person to Student. This isn't possible, because the object is a Person, and the Person type has no knowledge of Student.

My interpretation of it is that objects have a specific type, regardless of how you cast it. A cast (like the way light is cast on an object) just dictates how you see that object. In the example case, a Person has no knowledge of a Student, therefore no matter how you look at it, you can't assign it to student.

A Student object, however, can be upcast to a Person, since every Student is a Person. You can always upcast to base classes, but you can't always downcast to derived classes.

I hope this gives you some clarity. (I also hope I got this totally right.)

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but how can I upcast Student taking an intance of Person? In fact I already have an instance with Person, with the business data linked to it. I'd like to make a "copy" of Person and extend it... –  paizza Mar 8 '13 at 8:32

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