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I have two styles, one which is at element level 'td' and another which is at class level '.specialTable td'. And I've run into some problems as the class level style is inheriting all the 'td' style properties if I have not specified them again.

I have a CSS style

td
{
  background-color:black;
}

and then I have

.specialTable tr:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: white;
}

and

.specialTable td
{
  background-color:none;
}

What happens here is that even though I've asked.specialTable td to have no background, it inherits the black background from element style 'td' and this causes my element style 'tr' to be blocked out, because cells are on top of rows.

I am trying to set alternating row style to my table. Please help me with how I can stop the original 'td' element style from getting in the way.

Here is the fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/PIyer/phADs/1/

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
it should be .specialTable tr:nth-child.... you forgot the . Also, css takes the last style, so but the one you want to override, at the bottom of the file(atleast under what it is overriding) –  cwhelms Mar 6 '13 at 15:32
    
@cwhelms Unless it has higher specificity... –  kapa Mar 6 '13 at 15:34
1  
Please set up a jsfiddle demo. It's hard to understand your problem... –  kapa Mar 6 '13 at 15:34
    
please give me 2min, I'll add the fiddle –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 15:35
    
jsfiddle.net/PIyer/phADs –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 15:49

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

you have a type in your css, but im not sure if that is the problem

specialTable tr:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: white;
}

should be

.specialTable tr:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: white;
}

aslso background-color:none is not valid css , maybee background-color:transparent

share|improve this answer
    
sorry, that was a typo while typing the question here. It is correct in my code. –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 15:33
    
added some additions to my original answer –  Björn Mårtensson Mar 6 '13 at 15:35
    
background-color:transparent worked. –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 15:41
    
but I want to know a more enduring solution. I'll post my fiddle and better my question. 2min. –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 15:41
    
jsfiddle.net/PIyer/phADs/1 here is the fiddle. I can add background-color:transparent to the class style and make it work, but is there anyway top stop css style properties from getting inherited by default? –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 15:51

none is not a valid property for the background color. Try this:

.specialTable tr {
    background-color: black;
}

.specialTable tr:nth-child(even) {
    background-color: white;
}

Or you might use in your example just

.specialTable td
{
    background-color: transparent;
}

This should let the white shine through.

share|improve this answer

You could simplify things, by using basic CSS overriding.

Let's say you have this:

<table class="specialTable">
    <tr>
        <td>This is an odd row</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>This is an even row</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>This is an odd row</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
        <td>This is an even row</td>
    </tr>
</table>

And your default <td> style is this:

td { 
    background-color:black;
    color: #FFF;
}

To make alternating (zebra) styling to .specialTable, you can simply do this:

.specialTable tr:nth-child(even) td {
    background-color: blue;
}

This will override the original CSS defintion for <td> for all <td> tags within an even <tr> tag.

Check out a working example here: http://jsfiddle.net/rh5vV/

It's important to note that the nth-child sudo selector does not work in versions of IE8 and lower, so you may want to apply a class of .even to your even <tr> tags.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot. Is there any way to stop it from getting inherited by default instead of having to manually override by using background-color:black ?? –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 15:48
    
I'm not sure what you mean. You have a default <td> style, you want to override it. What do you mean by "manually"? There's no magic here. You simply override existing styles by placing the overwritten definition below the default definition. –  Axel Mar 6 '13 at 15:53
    
Okay. I expected the properties that I had not set to in the class style that I had defined, to default to the property values, that you would have, if you didn't use styles. It instead inherited the 'td' style instead and that threw me off..me using none instead of transparent didn't help either. I understood now :) –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 15:58
    
none didn't work, most likely becauase you applied it to background-color. I believe background: none; will have the same effect as background-color: transparent;. Just remember that background: none; will remove all background attributes for that selector (including background images). –  Axel Mar 6 '13 at 16:01
    
noted! I used background-color:none though and that didn't work. –  Wired-In Mar 6 '13 at 16:03

Try this out

 .specialTable tr td {
         background-color:transparent;
    }

using background none is incorrect, use transparent instead

http://jsfiddle.net/RBY2v/1/

share|improve this answer
    
    
woops, forgot to delete that. I was testing something out –  npage Mar 6 '13 at 15:49

You can use background-color:transparent; or depending on background:none;:

.specialTable td {
  background-color:transparent;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why the donwvotes? –  DarkAjax Mar 6 '13 at 15:33
1  
1. !important is NOT the solution in 99% of the cases. Just causes more problems later. 2. You misunderstood the problem. (-1) –  kapa Mar 6 '13 at 15:38
    
I did not downvote, but !important is intended for user stylesheets to overwrite author styles and should not be used in websites' css declarations. If you do, then it's a clear sign that something is wrong with your css hierarchy. –  acme Mar 6 '13 at 15:38

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