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x = 1;
std::cout << ((++x)+(++x)+(++x));

I expect the output to be 11, but it's actually 12. Why?

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21  
I would expect it to be 9... :/ –  Charlie Somerville Oct 6 '09 at 12:09
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@Charlie: Some kompilers might do that :) –  Artelius Oct 6 '09 at 12:21
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I would expect a goat sacrifice before relying on code like that. –  György Andrasek Oct 6 '09 at 12:21
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I still would like to hear why you would expect the result to be 11... –  Ed S. Nov 22 '09 at 1:34
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I commented mostly because Charlie Somerville was expecting 9. It's pretty clearly been established in the answers that the result is undefined in C++. So now I'm wondering what other C-syntax derived languages do. –  Nosredna Nov 22 '09 at 2:38
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5 Answers

up vote 63 down vote accepted

We explain it by expecting undefined behaviour rather than any particular result. As the expression attempts to modify x multiple times without an intervening sequence point its behaviour is undefined.

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Welcome to C/C++ world. –  bua Oct 6 '09 at 12:17
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+1 I just tried this using gcc 3.2.2 on Linux, and the expression returns 10 (9 and 12 eat your heart out...) –  Todd Owen Oct 6 '09 at 12:23
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Then why isn't it a syntax error? Anything ambiguous that makes it into compiled code...seems like an oversight. –  Alex Feinman Oct 6 '09 at 13:34
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@Bill: it's not really like asking that, since your example requires DFA to analyse, whereas "multiple sub-expressions of an expression which modify the same variable and are not separated in the full expression by a sequence point" is at least theoretically diagnosable just by local analysis of the expression. But the way the C++ standard expresses the rule is "any allowable execution order of the expression" has no sequence-point separator, and implementations are quite reasonably not expected to reason about all legal execution orders. –  Steve Jessop Oct 6 '09 at 15:15
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As others have said, the C and C++ standards do not define the behaviour that this will produce.

But for those people who don't see why the standards would do such a thing, let's go through a "real world" example:

1 * 2 + 3 + 4 * 5

There's nothing wrong with calculating 1 * 2 + 3 before we calculate 4*5. Just because multiplication has a higher precedence than addition doesn't mean we need to perform all multiplication in the expression before doing any addition. In fact there are many different orders you validly could perform your calculations.

Where evaluations have side effects, different evaluation orders can affect the result. If the standard does not define the behaviour, do not rely on it.

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then what is the use of operator precedence. i don't understand your example: 1*2 + 3 + 4 * 5 = (1*2) + 3 + (4*5) no? –  Rohit Banga Oct 6 '09 at 12:46
    
or a simpler example: 1*2+3*4= (1*2)+(3*4) –  Rohit Banga Oct 6 '09 at 12:47
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(1*2+3) + (4+5) == (1*2) + (3+4*5). there is more than exactly one way to sequence the execution, such that order of operations is still preserved. math is stateless, but if an operation affects state, you have to specify the sequence of execution more specifically. –  Dustin Getz Oct 6 '09 at 12:52
    
what about associativity? left to right –  Rohit Banga Oct 6 '09 at 13:05
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@Dustin Getz: Technically, C++ grammar specifies that the expression must be (((1*2) + 3) + (4*5)) and not ((1*2) + (3 + (4*5))) but you are right that the calculation order could be 1*2, 4*5, (1*2)+3, ((1*2) + 3) + (4*5) or 1*2, (1*2) + 3, 4*5, ((1*2) + 3) + (4*5) or a number of other possibilities including independent parts being done in parallel. –  Charles Bailey Oct 6 '09 at 13:10
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This is actually undefined. C++ doesn't define explicitly the order of execution of a statement so it depends on the compiler and this syntax shouldn't be used.

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It's actually worse than just the order of execution being unspecified (which would just mean you don't know what the answer will be), in this case the behavior is undefined (so you don't know whether your computer will catch fire). –  Steve Jessop Oct 6 '09 at 15:22
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The code snippet will invoke Undefined behavior in both C/C++.Read about Sequence Point from here.

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+1 for the link –  neuro May 19 '10 at 16:22
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Try putting in (++x)+(++x)+(--x), (++x)+(--x)+(++x) or (--x)+(++x)+(++x).

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How does that answer the question? –  Mike Dec 22 '12 at 7:06
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