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I am using netbeans; I can't figure out the way we are supposed to structure the project when we want to access a ressource file (e.g. a txt file that contains static info):

Here is a simple example, I have a file called Test.java that reads inside a txt file called myfile.txt

I want to type something like :

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try{
            File f = new File("myfile.txt");
            Scanner s = new Scanner(f);
            System.out.println(s.next());
        }
        catch(Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

which seems reasonnable if the myfile.txt is located in the same directory as the .java file.

But NO it seems that if I type my code like that, the txt file should be at the same level as src/ that is the root of my project. Ok I'll accept that and put the txt there, so I clean and build. Now if I run in netbeans (the green arrow button) it runs fine (even if there is no txt file in my build folder, which seems strange) BUT of course if I try to execute directly the jar in the dist folder (which should be the thing you want to distribute once the project is finished) the program fails since there is no txt folder inside the jar ofr next to it.

Ok so I change my strategy and go for the thing which seemed logical, that is put my txt inside the src directory. When I build it appears in the build directory, and also inside the jar.

BUT the program fails (both within netbeans and outside) since the path to the file is not proper in the new File command. So I could change and type

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try{
            File f = new File("src/myfile.txt");
            Scanner s = new Scanner(f);
            System.out.println(s.next());
        }
        catch(Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

but now of course it won't run outside netbeans because the src folder does not mean anything to the poor .jar file.

I can't find a way to address this supposedly trivial task.

Can you help me?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want the textfile inside the jar you can use is like this:

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try{
            Scanner s = new Scanner(Test.class.getResourceAsStream("/myfile.txt")); // <- in the src folder
            Scanner s2 = new Scanner(Test.class.getResourceAsStream("./myfile.txt")); // <- in the package of your *.java file
            System.out.println(s.next());
            System.out.println(s2.next());
        }
        catch(Exception e){
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for this answer. I knew this trick, but somehow I find it very strange to be force to use the 'getResourceAsStream'. I don't understand why I cannot use a normal declaration with the File class. –  user2140558 Mar 8 '13 at 16:56
    
Well you can imagine it like this: NetBeans will put everything in you src-folder and put it into a .jar file ( which is an .zip file ). Your IDE will then put this .jar file in the root-folder of your project and run it there. That means the relative path "./" will be your project-folder but the myfile.txt is inside the jar-file and you can access these file by Class.getResourceAsStream. It just seems a bit strange to have the file 'so far away' in your project... if you would export your project as a runnable jar myfile.txt would be in the same directory. –  Wolfii Mar 8 '13 at 19:38
    
You could also have a look at what jar-files contain stackoverflow.com/questions/12079230/… –  Wolfii Mar 8 '13 at 19:46

Try this:

Let the File object be initialized like this File f = new File("myfile.txt");.

Now don't export myfile.txt as part of the jar, but place it next to the jar file in the same directory.

share|improve this answer
    
So I put the txt file in the root of the folder, ant then move it myself to the dist folder. Why does Netbans wants me to act like that? Why can't I put everything in the src (maybe enven in packages called Resources)? –  user2140558 Mar 6 '13 at 16:10
    
Even if you export the jar along with the txt, the above statement should work. Don't add src in the file path. –  Nishant Shreshth Mar 6 '13 at 16:19
    
yes I agree I can delete the src but if I want to be able to run my code in the IDE then I need to put that txt file at the root of the project, which seems unlogical to me. Is this really the way a simple task like this is meant to be done? What if I have hundreds of such txt files? Isn't the logical way to put a package named REsources inside src, and expect the jar file to contain everything? –  user2140558 Mar 6 '13 at 16:35
    
You need not put the txt file at the root even if you're using an IDE. The file should be accessible even if it lies in a different package. –  Nishant Shreshth Mar 6 '13 at 16:40
    
I don't get it. If I initialize with 'File f=new File("myfile.txt")', where should this file be if I work with netbeans? Apparently not in the src dir with the java main class, but at the root of the project. –  user2140558 Mar 6 '13 at 17:21

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