Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
bool _Error = false;
ThesResult _tr;
try { _tr = engine["en"].LookupSynonyms(_Word, true); }
catch (Exception)
{
    _Error = true;
}
if (_Error)
{
    _Synonyms.Add(word);
}
else
{
     List<string> SynonymNew = new List<string>();
     foreach (ThesMeaning meaning in _tr.Meanings)

The error occurs at the bottom line _tr.Meanings. I have no idea how to fix this, everything seems to be OK logically but I need to find a way to make the compiler see that.

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Set _tr to null when you declare it. The compiler sees that there's a chance it may not have been initialised.

share|improve this answer

I'm going to go ahead and say that perhaps you might want to re-think your order of operations. try... catch (set flag) if(flag) is close to an anti-pattern. There are several good reasons for doing this:

  • It is not the clearest way to write the code
  • You aren't allocating extra memory this way
  • You are using one fewer variables (my guess is that _Error is not used elsewhere)

    bool _Error = false;
    // ThesResult _tr; <!-- only needed in the try block.
    try { 
        ThesResult _tr = engine["en"].LookupSynonyms(_Word, true); 
        List<string> SynonymNew = new List<string>();
        // no worries about initializing it to null.
        foreach (ThesMeaning meaning in _tr.Meanings)
        // your loop and the rest of the function.
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {
        _Synonyms.Add(word); // is this supposed to be _Word?
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I was just about to suggest this in my answer. –  Nick Mar 6 '13 at 15:58

You must assign the value of _tr before using it. If you want to drink water from a recipient with no water, then you are not drinking anything, are you?

In the try part of your code it cannot guarantee that it will get a value for _tr , so you must initialize your variable yourself before using it, at least with null.

share|improve this answer

You'll need to assign null to objects at least before using them:

 bool _Error = false;
 ThesResult _tr = null;
 try { _tr = engine["en"].LookupSynonyms(_Word, true); }
 catch (Exception)
       {
          _Error = true;
       }
       if (_Error)
       {
           _Synonyms.Add(word);
       }
       else
         {
                    List<string> SynonymNew = new List<string>();
                    foreach (ThesMeaning meaning in _tr.Meanings)
share|improve this answer

C# requires that you guarantee that a variable has been assigned a value before trying to use it. In this case, if the LookupSynonyms method throws an exception, then _tr will never get a value, not even null.

So it won't let you compile unless you can guarantee that you've at least assigned something (even null) to the variable before you use it.

This is unlike some other languages (VB) which automatically initialize a variable to its default value (like null or zero or whatever), or other languages (C++) which the variable starts out as garbage (whatever happened to be in that memory address at the time).

share|improve this answer

When initializing set _tr = null

ThesResult _tr = null;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.