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Here is my jsFiddle.The specific CSS I am referring to is on the selector .inner div. By 'will it be bad,' I mean, would you use it on your page? Do you foresee any problems with it? Is there a name for this technique? Is there a better way to accomplish this? My goal was to make the two divs floated left #one and #two to match heights, and as you can see, the aqua color on the left one is stretching all the way to the bottom of the section.

html

<section>
    <div class="inner">
    <div id="one"><p>Lorem</p></div>
    <div id="two">
        <p>Sed ut perspiciatis unde omnis iste natus error sit voluptatem accusantium doloremque laudantium, totam rem aperiam, eaque ipsa quae ab illo inventore veritatis et quasi architecto beatae vitae dicta sunt explicabo. Nemo enim ipsam voluptatem quia voluptas sit aspernatur aut odit aut fugit, sed quia consequuntur magni dolores eos qui ratione voluptatem sequi nesciunt. Neque porro quisquam est, qui dolorem ipsum quia dolor sit amet, consectetur, adipisci velit, sed quia non numquam eius modi tempora incidunt ut labore</p>
    </div>
    </div>
    <div class="clear"></div>
</section>

css

section {
    width: 60%;
    margin: 0 auto;
    border: 1px solid red;
    border-radius: 5px;
}
#one, #two {
    float: left;
    width: 50%;
}
#one {
    background: aqua;
    padding-bottom: 1000px;
}
.clear {
    clear: both;
}

.inner {
    overflow: hidden;
}
.inner div {
    margin-bottom: -1000px;
    padding-bottom: 1000px;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Jeeeeeez, I'd say even using a table would be nicer than that :) –  mattytommo Mar 6 '13 at 15:57
    
But then I want the divs to stack on top of each other if the screen size is small. –  sherlock Mar 6 '13 at 16:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's not great, plus if that text ever changes size, you'll have to adjust your CSS.

Instead, remove that padding and margin, give the whole .inner a background of aqua, but change the background of #two to be white.

Here's what I changed in the fiddle:

#two {
    background-color: #fff;
}

.inner {
    background: aqua;
    overflow: hidden;
    border-radius: 5px;
}

Fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/QtTeA/1/

share|improve this answer
    
nice simple solution –  Richlewis Mar 6 '13 at 16:08
    
Sweet, that seems more legit. –  sherlock Mar 6 '13 at 16:09
    
@sherlock Glad I could help :). Just call me watson! –  mattytommo Mar 6 '13 at 16:15

Yeah it does feel nasty, I wouldn't do it. I'd personally just use a

min-height:1000px /* Or whatever height */

on each DIV, its a lot more flexible. The moment you put any content in #one it will become longer than #two

share|improve this answer
    
What if the text changes though? The CSS also needs updating, not exactly an ideal solution :) –  mattytommo Mar 6 '13 at 16:06
    
I don't want them that high, just enough to fit what's inside. –  sherlock Mar 6 '13 at 16:07
    
What is going to be going in the aqua DIV? Maybe use a combo of my answer and the other answer on this page –  James King Mar 6 '13 at 16:11

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