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Suppose I have a List of Person (which is a class). It contains about 20 field (Name, Surname, Age, DateOfBirthdate, and so on). So I got this list:

var listOfPersons= MyContext.Persons.Cast<Person>();

Now, I need to iterate through this List, and for each Person adding a new field (which it is not present in the class), called, let's say, CurrentDateTime.

I could create a new object, with the new field, and "copy & paste" values from Person to the new Class. Somethings like:

PersonNew newPerson = new PersonNew("Name", "Surname", "Age", "DateOfBirthdate", ... "CurrentDateTime");

But this is very bad if in the future I change the Person class. So, is there a strategy to "extending Person" with a new field? That takes the Person instance (whatever it is) and adds the new field?

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1  
How long do you want to use this extended Person? If it's just for this method you can use an anonymous type. –  Tim Schmelter Mar 6 '13 at 16:13
    
Which scenario you have to do this? –  Cuong Le Mar 6 '13 at 16:14
    
No solution can possibly be safe from arbitrary changes to the base class without modifying the extended class. It's the "brittle base class problem". –  Servy Mar 6 '13 at 16:16
    
Yeah, I should use an anonymous type...but how? Can't "extend" it in LINQ –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 16:17
    
Is incredible that there isn't a way... it is just a copy to an object to another one "more" big haha –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 16:22
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4 Answers

You can create some static method that create PersonNew from Person using Automapper.

public class PersonNew : Person
{
    public static PersonNew CreateFromPerson(Person person, DateTime currentDateTime)
    {
        var newPerson = Mapper.Map<PersonNew>(person);
        newPerson.CurrentDateTime = currentDateTime;
    }
}
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It's worth nothing that only certain types of changes to the base class would be supported in this example; complex additions/modifications could result in this solution not working properly. –  Servy Mar 6 '13 at 16:17
    
@Servy: uhm, for example? –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 16:25
    
@paizza If there are internal properties that are time based, such as storing the date of creation of the object, or if it captures the state of some other type of external resource when created (for example a synchronization context). Any information not stored in a public property/field, such as information set via a method. And then of course because you have a new object any existing references to the old object won't refer to the new one, which may not be desirable for you. Really if your object does much more than just have a bunch of properties, odds are it won't work. –  Servy Mar 6 '13 at 16:29
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I think that the solution you described works fine. If you want to keep track of each person's birthday without extending the Person class, you might use a Dictionary object

var listOfPersons = MyContext.Perons.Cast<Person>();
Dictionary<Person, DateTime> birthdays = new Dictionary<Person, DateTime>    
foreach(Person person in listOfPersons)
{
    birthdays.Add(person, getBirthday(person); 
}
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uhm no...can't do person.CurrentDateTime here... –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 16:20
    
@paizza Well, the point of the answer is that you wouldn't need to. It may solve your problem even if it's not technically answering the question. –  Servy Mar 6 '13 at 16:26
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One solution is to make your class partial, and add your field in another partial definition of your class:

public partial class Person
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string FirstName { get; set; }
    ...
}

...

public partial class Person
{
    public DateTime CurrentDateTime { get; set; }
}

...

var listOfPersons = MyContext.Persons.Cast<Person>();
foreach (var person in listOfPersons)
{
    person.CurrentDateTime = ....
}

Do note that you will use the same instance of your class.

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I cannot put my class Partial. Come with a specify DLL –  paizza Mar 6 '13 at 16:20
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First I would suggest using extension methods for projecting collections instead of iterating. Like that:

var newCollection = oldCollection.Select(entity => MakeNewType(entity))

Second, it's not completely clear what you mean by "extending Person" with a new field. Here are the couple of ways you can accomplish that.

1) Make another class with the new field and map it to the old one. This is a common scenario for asp.net mvc application where you map models to the appropriate viewmodels. Automapper is useful for these types of scenario (see Sławomir Rosiek anwser)

2) Take advantage of dlr in c# 4+. Yuo will lose the intellisense for dynamic objects, but they canned be passed around functions

var newPeople = people.Select(p =>
    {
        dynamic expando = new ExpandoObject();
        expando.Id = p.Id;
        expando.FirtName = p.FirtName;
        /* ... */
        expando.CurrentDateTime = DateTime.Now;
        return expando;
    });

3) Use Anonymous types. Anonymous types cannot be passed to another functions, so this approach is useful when you need to quickly project data inside a single method and calculate some result

var newPeople = people.Select(p => new 
    { 
        Id = p.Id, 
        FirtName = p.FirtName, 
        /* ... */ 
        CurrentDateTime = DateTime.Now 
    });

in both cases you can now access newly "created" property:

foreach(var p in newPeople)
{
    Console.WriteLine("CurrentDateTime: {0}", p.CurrentDateTime);
}

4) If you really need to create a fully featured .net class at runtime you can use Reflection.Emit. This scenario is typically used to create dynamic proxies - subclasses which implement some functionality only known at runtime. Entity framework does this.

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