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Recently a fellow worker showed to me a code like this:

void SomeClass::function()
{
    static bool init = false;

    if (!init)
    {
        // hundreds of lines of ugly code
    }

    init = true;
}

He wants to check if SomeClass is initialized in order to execute some piece of code once per Someclass instance but the fact is that only one instance of SomeClass will exist in all the lifetime of the program.

His question were about the init static variable, about when it's initialized. I've answered that the initialization occurs once, so the value will be false at first call and true the rest of its lifetime. After answering I've added that such use of static variables is bad practice but I haven't been able to explain why.

The reasons that I've been thinking so far are the following:

  • The behaviour of static bool init into SomeClass::function could be achieved with a non-static member variable.
  • Other functions in SomeClass couldn't check the static bool init value because it's visibility is limited to the void SomeClass::function() scope.
  • The static variables aren't OOPish because they define a global state instead of a object state.

This reasons looks poor, unclever and not very concrete to me so I'm asking for more reasons to explain why the use of static variables in function and member-function space are a bad practice.

Thanks!

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2  
The behaviour of static bool init into SomeClass::function could be achieved with a non-static member variable. how? If it's non-static, the code between the if (!init) {} would be called once per instance. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 6 '13 at 16:35
    
@LuchianGrigore my bad, there's some lack of information about the code of my fellow worker, he wanted to check the initialization state of each instance of SomeClass, not to check once per class, due to the fact that SomeClass will have only one instance in all the program, I think is better to create a IsInitialized non-static member value. I'd better edit the text to clarify this point. –  PaperBirdMaster Mar 7 '13 at 7:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is certainly a rare occurrence, at least, in good quality code, because of the narrow case for which it's appropriate. What this basically does is a just-in-time initialization of a global state (to deliver some global functionality). A typical example of this is having a random number generator function that seeds the generator at the first call to it. Another typical use of this is a function that returns the instance of a singleton, initialized on the first call. But other use-case examples are few and far between.

In general terms, global state is not desirable, and having objects that contain self-sufficient states is preferred (for modularity, etc.). But if you need global state (and sometimes you do), you have to implement it somehow. If you need any kind of non-trivial global state, then you should probably go with a singleton class, and one of the preferred ways to deliver that application-wide single instance is through a function that delivers a reference to a local static instance initialized on the first call. If the global state needed is a bit more trivial, then doing the scheme with the local static bool flag is certainly an acceptable way to do it. In other words, I see no fundamental problem with employing that method, but I would naturally question its motivations (requiring a global state) if presented with such code.

As is always the case for global data, multi-threading will cause some problems with a simplistic implementation like this one. Naive introductions of global state are never going to be inherently thread-safe, and this case is no exception, you'd have to take measures to address that specific problem. And that is part of the reasons why global states are not desirable.

The behaviour of static bool init into SomeClass::function could be achieved with a non-static member variable.

If there is an alternative to achieve the same behavior, then the two alternatives have to be judged on the technical issues (like thread-safety). But in this case, the required behavior is the questionable thing, more so than the implementation details, and the existence of alternative implementations doesn't change that.

Second, I don't see how you can replace a just-in-time initialization of a global state by anything that is based on a non-static data member (a static data member, maybe). And even if you can, it would be wasteful (require per-object storage for a one-time-per-program-execution thing), and on that ground alone, wouldn't make it a better alternative.

Other functions in SomeClass couldn't check the static bool init value because it's visibility is limited to the void SomeClass::function() scope.

I would generally put that in the "Pro" column (as in Pro/Con). This is a good thing. This is information hiding or encapsulation. If you can hide away things that shouldn't be a concern to others, then great! But if there are other functions that would need to know that the global state has already been initialized or not, then you probably need something more along the lines of a singleton class.

The static variables aren't OOPish because they define a global state instead of a object state.

OOPish or not, who cares? But yes, the global state is the concern here. Not so much the use of a local static variable to implement its initialization. Global states, especially mutable global states, are bad in general and should never be abused. They hinder modularity (modules are less self-sufficient if they rely on global states), they introduce multi-threading concerns since they are inherently shared data, they make any function that use them non-reentrant (non-pure), they make debugging difficult, etc... the list goes on. But most of these issues are not tied to how you implement it. On the other hand, using a local static variable is a good way to solve the static-initialization-order-fiasco, so, they are good for that reason, one less problem to worry about when introducing a (well-justified) global state into your code.

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Think multi-threading. This type of code is problematic when function() can be called concurrently by multiple threads. Without locking, you're open to race conditions; with locking, concurrency can suffer for no real gain.

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The initialization of local static variables is guaranteed to be thread-safe in C++11 though –  Andy Prowl Mar 6 '13 at 16:32
    
I've realized this point few seconds after clicking on "Post Your Question" button. lol –  PaperBirdMaster Mar 6 '13 at 16:34
2  
@AndyProwl: I don't mean that. I mean that two threads can happily go into the if (!init) block. –  NPE Mar 6 '13 at 16:34
2  
@AndyProwl initialization, yes, but there's also the if (!init) in there. –  Luchian Grigore Mar 6 '13 at 16:34
    
@AndyProwl Initialization, yes. But that set to true and the if() eval is utterly terrible. –  WhozCraig Mar 6 '13 at 16:34

Global state is probably the worst problem here. Other functions don't have to be concerned with it, so it's not an issue. The fact that it can be achieved without static variable essentially means you made some form of a singleton. Which of course introduces all problems that singleton has, like being totally unsuitable for multithreaded environment, for one.

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Adding to what others said, you can't have multiple objects of this class at the same time, or at least would they not behave as expected. The first instance would set the static variable and do the initialization. The ones created later though would not have their own version of init but share it with all other instances. Since the first instance set it to true, all following won't do any initialization, which is most probably not what you want.

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My reading of the question suggests that this is precisely what the OP wants. –  NPE Mar 6 '13 at 16:45
    
I'm not sure why he said that the same behavior could be achieved with a non-static variable then. If that's what he wants and multi-threading is not an issue, I don't see why one shouldn't do it like that. –  ahans Mar 6 '13 at 16:53

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