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Below is a flawed (and simplified) template function that expects to work on a template arg that can be converted to one of a predefined number of types.

It happens to be 2 types, but it cold be many more.

void do_something_type_specific( const int &unused ) { std::cout << 'i'; }
void do_something_type_specific( const std::string &unused ) { std::cout << 's'; }

template< typename Iterator >
void perform_work_on_a_range( Iterator begin, Iterator end )
{
    do_something_type_specific( *begin );
    // Perhaps more code...
}

This happens to produce the desired results in my environment. Template instances will compile successfully iff *Iterator produces a type that's convertible to exactly one of the choices.

However, this code unnecessarily requests that the conversion be performed and, despite unused being unused, there is still UB when begin == end.

How can this this behavior be implemented in C++03 without these problems?

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3  
I think it could probably be done with SFINAE. –  Tony The Lion Mar 6 '13 at 16:49
    
As far as I know, C++03 only provides a "simple" runtime, where there is no way to see what a type can be converted to. It is a static language, apart from a little runtime-polymorphism. –  bash.d Mar 6 '13 at 16:50
1  
@bash.d what a type can be converted to is static information (remember, C++ is a static language!). I don't see why runtime would be involved in that. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Mar 6 '13 at 16:51
    
@bash.d: But he takes the type as a template parameter, so he can. –  Puppy Mar 6 '13 at 16:51
    
Is this what you're looking for? liveworkspace.org/code/3A44Ws$7 –  Praetorian Mar 6 '13 at 17:09
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4 Answers

Instead of dereferencing the iterator that my result in undefined behaviour when begin == end, you could try using std::iterator_traits<>. E.g.:

#include <iterator>
#include <string>
#include <cstdio>

void do_something_type_specific(std::string const&) { printf("%s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__); }
void do_something_type_specific(int const&) { printf("%s\n", __PRETTY_FUNCTION__); }

template<class T>
struct ProduceValue
{
    static T value;
};

template<class T>
T ProduceValue<T>::value;

// Specializations for types that can't be default constructed or must be initialized.
template<>
char* ProduceValue<char*>::value = "";

template< typename Iterator >
void perform_work_on_a_range( Iterator begin, Iterator end )
{
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits<Iterator>::value_type value_type;
    do_something_type_specific(ProduceValue<value_type>::value);
}

int main() {
    char** p = 0;
    perform_work_on_a_range(p, p);

    long* q = 0;
    perform_work_on_a_range(q, q);
}

Output:

void do_something_type_specific(const string&)
void do_something_type_specific(const int&)

The only inconvenience is that ProduceValue<T> has to be specialized for types that can't be default constructed or must be initialized for other reasons (like char*).

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I'm an expert, and even I can't figure out how you could possibly use this to avoid UB. –  Puppy Mar 6 '13 at 17:01
    
@DeadMG you basically just put your expert title on the line, like all in ) –  Maxim Yegorushkin Mar 6 '13 at 17:02
1  
@DeadMG you could, for instance, use iterator_traits<>::value_type together with boost::is_convertible to write a meta function to determine whether the value type is convertible instead of dereferencing the iterator. Or maybe call a function with a (value_type *)0 pointer. –  dhavenith Mar 6 '13 at 17:07
1  
@DeadMG You'd use std::iterator_traits<Iterator>::value_type to call the appropriate type-specific function. –  Praetorian Mar 6 '13 at 17:07
1  
@DeadMG drastically changed functionality - the target function does not use the argument, so what is wrong with passing any value of that type? using some random awful global variable instead - as long as it does not affect how other parts of the program operate, what is wrong with that on practice please? –  Maxim Yegorushkin Mar 6 '13 at 21:35
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There is a boost::is_convertible metafunction that you can use to determine if a type T can be converted to some other type U.

Secondly, for begin == end, just insert a run-time check.

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"for begin == end, just insert a run-time check" that would change the behavior, wouldn't it? Which do_something_type_specific should be called then? –  Drew Dormann Mar 6 '13 at 16:54
3  
@DrewDormann: You requested that it didn't have UB when begin == end. That's changing the behaviour. So it meets the requirements. You can't know if begin == end without checking. –  Puppy Mar 6 '13 at 16:56
    
Which do_something_type_specific() should be called in that circumstance? –  Drew Dormann Mar 6 '13 at 16:58
1  
@DrewDormann: How the hell should I know? Defining the semantics of this function for the empty range are your problem. –  Puppy Mar 6 '13 at 17:00
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The problematic code in the question is trying to leverage features of both template parameters and function parameters.

Function parameters allow type conversions, but require an instantiation of the type. Template parameters don't need instantiation, but also don't perform type conversions.

The pattern below uses Boost's enable_if and is_convertible to allow template functions to be chosen by the compiler as if template parameters supported the same type conversion rules as function parameters. (Thank @dhavenith for the suggestion)

#include <boost/utility.hpp>
#include <boost/type_traits.hpp>

// enable_if_c makes the return type either void or a Substitution Failure.
template < typename T>
typename boost::enable_if_c<boost::is_convertible<T,int>::value>::type
do_something_type_specific()
{
  std::cout << 'i';
}

template < typename T>
typename boost::enable_if_c<boost::is_convertible<T,std::string>::value>::type
do_something_type_specific()
{
  std::cout << 's';
}

template< typename Iterator >
void perform_work_on_a_range( Iterator begin, Iterator end )
{
    // This code is from @MaximYegorushkin's answer.  Vote him up :)
    typedef typename std::iterator_traits<Iterator>::value_type value_type;
    do_something_type_specific<value_type>();
    // Perhaps more code...
}

This has been verified with @MaximYegorushkin's sample main.

int main() {
    char** p = 0;
    perform_work_on_a_range(p, p);

    long* q = 0;
    perform_work_on_a_range(q, q);
}

Output:

si
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1  
This is quite elegant. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Mar 6 '13 at 19:09
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You probably want to do something like this instead:

template <typename T>
void do_something_type_specific() {}
template <>
void do_something_type_specific<int>() {...}
template <typename Iterator>
void perform_work_on_a_range(Iterator begin, Iterator end) {
    do_something_type_specific<typename Iterator::value_type>();
}
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1  
If Iterator::value_type is say short that should call int version because short is convertible to int. –  Maxim Yegorushkin Mar 6 '13 at 17:26
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