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This typescript:

export enum UID {
    FACTORY,
    ROBOT
}

compiles to this javascript:

(function (UID) {
    UID._map = [];
    UID._map[0] = "FACTORY";
    UID.FACTORY = 0;
    UID._map[1] = "ROBOT";
    UID.ROBOT = 1;
})(exports.UID || (exports.UID = {}));
var UID = exports.UID;

I have to admit that the code seems rather obscure to me but I trusted the tsc compiler to know what it's doing. Unfortunately the javascript can't be executed. nodejs complains that:

(function (UID) {

^ TypeError: object is not a function

at ...

What have I done wrong ?

UPDATE: Matt B. has solved the problem. This is a known bug in the typescript compiler. tsc fails to insert semicolons after require statements, this can lead to strange errors. Manually adding the semicolons to my code solved the problem. Here's the link to the codeplex issue: http://typescript.codeplex.com/workitem/364

UPDATE 2: for those of you that experience the same error. You can insert the missing semicolons manually but that is not a very comfortable solution since you have to do this after every compilation. I noted that the problem only occurs with the enum. There are lots of other modules in the project and none of them have caused this error. Apparently a class definition is not "harmed" by the missing semicolons in front of it. Just move the definition of the enum behind one of your class definitions and the error should disappear. It's not sufficient to move the enum behind an interface since interfaces have no direct equivalent and are just deleted by the compiler

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2  
Is that the whole script? –  Bergi Mar 6 '13 at 16:57
3  
That second ) (in your error message) shouldn't be there: (function (UID)) {. The code portion works fine: jsfiddle.net/antisanity/cRNeN –  canon Mar 6 '13 at 16:59
1  
incorrect concatenation with another file? –  Jan Dvorak Mar 6 '13 at 17:01
1  
The code in the error message is not the same as the code posted above it. The error contains the double ), not the sample posted. –  Pointy Mar 6 '13 at 17:02
1  
And it's not needed because you're in node.js so exports is already defined. –  Matt Browne Mar 6 '13 at 17:29
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I think this is the same issue as described here -- which turned out to be due to a missing semicolon after a require() statement:

Typescript generating javascript that doesn't work

Is there a line like this in another compiled file?

var UID = require('UID')

If so, try adding a semicolon at the end:

var UID = require('UID');

This appears to be a TypeScript bug; here's the bug report (vote it up!): http://typescript.codeplex.com/workitem/364

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yes, that solved the problem. Thank you for your answer. I upvoted the issue on codeplex, too –  lhk Mar 6 '13 at 17:33
1  
In case others want to upvote the bug report as well, here's the link: typescript.codeplex.com/workitem/364 –  Matt Browne Mar 6 '13 at 17:33
    
nice, Ill add the link to the question –  lhk Mar 6 '13 at 17:34
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In your Javascript you should have something like

var exports = exports || {};

Before

(function (UID) {
    UID._map = [];
    UID._map[0] = "FACTORY";
    UID.FACTORY = 0;
    UID._map[1] = "ROBOT";
    UID.ROBOT = 1;
})(exports.UID || (exports.UID = {}));
var UID = exports.UID;
share|improve this answer
    
but the javascript was not generated by me. Does that mean that the typescript compiler is responsible for this error ? –  lhk Mar 6 '13 at 17:22
    
The global exports reference is native to the Node.js environment and does not need to be declared. –  Bergi Mar 6 '13 at 17:25
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I tried and I have the same problem - I assume that the missing exports variables should be generated by the JavaScript code used to load the module when you do

import XXXX = module("XXXX");

that generates this JavaScript:

var XXXX = require("./XXXX")

and I think Matt B. is right and the problem there is the missing semi-colon after require(), that messes things up afterwards.

A fix is to place the enumeration declaration in a module:

module Test {

    export enum UID {
      FACTORY,
      ROBOT
    }

}

that generates:

var test;
(function (test) {
    (function (UID) {
        UID._map = [];
        UID._map[0] = "FACTORY";
        UID.FACTORY = 0;
        UID._map[1] = "ROBOT";
        UID.ROBOT = 1;
    })(test.UID || (test.UID = {}));
    var UID = test.UID;
})(test || (test = {}));

in this way the exports variable is no longer needed.

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