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I have a query that requires a some parameters.

Executing it on a standard query screen of the SQL Server Management Studio it works just as expected returning some rows of data after about 15 seconds. It's a complex query.

But executing it inside a stored procedure returns only the headers without any rows of data.

Also, the execution of it only take up to 1~2 seconds.

No error is returned or showed.

The aspect of it is like:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[sp_StoreProcedure]
    @FDId INT
    , @Year INT
    , @NDate DATETIME
    , @SDate DATETIME
    , @MId INT
AS
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON;

    SELECT of complex query
END

And it's invocation is simply:

DECLARE @FDId INT
DECLARE @Year INT
DECLARE @NDate DATETIME
DECLARE @SDate DATETIME
DECLARE @MId INT

SET @FDId = 926
SET @Year = 2012
SET @NDate = '1900-01-01'
SET @SDate = GetDate()
SET @MId = 1

EXEC [outsystems].[dbo].[sp_StoreProcedure]
    @FDId
    , @Year
    , @SDate
    , @NDate
    , @MId

But it returns an empty table.

How can this be possible ? What can I do to fix it ?

edit --> The complex query has 24 joins. It would be gigantic to show it in here.

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closed as too localized by Aaron Bertrand, Lamak, jcolebrand, Jeremy Banks, bluefeet Mar 6 '13 at 18:02

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The error is probably in complex query somewhere. Maybe if you actually show the query, someone will be able to point out the issue. –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 6 '13 at 17:07
    
We need to see the query really, it could be something as simple as one of your parameters not being used in the query text so it returns no results, but without seeing it, no one can tell. –  steoleary Mar 6 '13 at 17:11
    
Why don't you use temporary tables to follow the results? This way you can find where the records desappear. –  GRGodoi Mar 6 '13 at 17:15
    
This is why you should NAME YOUR PARAMETERS instead of relying on ordinal position. –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 6 '13 at 17:58
    
Side note: you should not use the sp_ prefix for your stored procedures. Microsoft has reserved that prefix for its own use (see Naming Stored Procedures), and you do run the risk of a name clash sometime in the future. It's also bad for your stored procedure performance. It's best to just simply avoid sp_ and use something else as a prefix - or no prefix at all! –  marc_s Mar 6 '13 at 18:21

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Easy mistake to make really.

When you declared your stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[sp_StoreProcedure]
    @FDId INT
    , @Year INT
    , @NDate DATETIME
    , @SDate DATETIME
    , @MId INT

You're not passing the parameters in the correct ordinal positions when executing it:

EXEC [outsystems].[dbo].[sp_StoreProcedure]
    @FDId
    , @Year
    , @SDate
    , @NDate
    , @MId

Notice that SDate and NDate are the opposite way around when calling the procedure.

This should work:

EXEC [outsystems].[dbo].[sp_StoreProcedure]
    @FDId
    , @Year
    , @NDate
    , @SDate
    , @MId

This would not have been a problem had you specified which parameter is which when executing (rather than relying on ordinal position) which would be a better idea going forward.

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Thanks! You're a life saver. –  Gil Mar 6 '13 at 17:26

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