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I've tried reading up on just how to use the stops, and looking at other answers here. Been tinkering with this snippet for too long now. I cant seem to get this animation to always be parallell.

Either it halts at some point or else it keeps queuing animations on the bottom lines (see code below). Either way, I cannot figure out where to put the stops to get this working properly.

    $(".property-wrapper").hover(function(e){

    var lines = new Array();
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-top"));
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-left"));
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-right"));
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-bottom-right"));
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-bottom-left"));

    if(e.type == "mouseenter")
    {
        // Animate, starting from top, and going parallell towards the bottom. Then the bottom ones meet eachother.
        // The motion forms a square
        /*
                Index 0 starts (from main.css) on left:50%; and animates to 0 while also animating width to 100%, giving
                the illusion of it "shooting" out in both directions
                Here is a representation of the indices and their direction of animation

                <---------0--------->
                1                   2
                |                   |
                |                   |
                |                   |
                |4--------><-------3|
        */
        $(lines[0]).animate({width:"100%", left:0}, 'fast', function(){
            $(lines[1]).animate({height:"100%"}, 'slow' , function(){
                $(lines[4]).animate({width:"50%"}, 'slow');
            });
            $(lines[2]).animate({height:"100%"}, 'slow', function(){
                $(lines[3]).animate({width:"50%"}, 'slow');
            });
        });
    }
    else
    {
        // Reverse the animation on mouseenter
        $(lines[3]).animate({width:0}, 'fast', function() {
            $(lines[2]).animate({height:0}, 'slow', function(){
                $(lines[0]).animate({width:0, left:"50%"}, 'fast');
            });
        });

        $(lines[4]).animate({width:0}, 'fast', function() {
            $(lines[1]).animate({height:0}, 'slow');
        });
    }
});

Hope anyone can help! Thanks

Edit: Here is basically how it is set up:

        <div>
            <div class="line-top"></div>
            <div class="line-left"></div>
            <div class="line-right"></div>
            <div class="line-bottom-right"></div>
            <div class="line-bottom-left"></div>
        </div>

And here is the CSS. The line div's parent is positioned relative, and the lines are absolute to control the position relative to the parent.

    .line-top, .line-left, .line-right, .line-bottom-right, .line-bottom-left 
   {    background:red; position:absolute; }
    .line-top { height:1px; width:0; left:50%; top:0; }
    .line-left { width:1px; height:0; left:0; top:0; }
    .line-right { width:1px; height:0; right:0; top:0; }
    .line-bottom-right { height:1px; width:0; right:0; bottom:0; }
    .line-bottom-left { height:1px; width:0; left:0; bottom:0; }
share|improve this question
    
Can you share any html or make a fiddle? I think I know where to put the stops, but I am not sure how to build your html and that is important to testing it. –  Pow-Ian Mar 6 '13 at 17:23
    
Yeah sure. Added to OP! –  Oyvind Andersson Mar 6 '13 at 18:04
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Well I originally over thought the hell out of this solution. Then when I was all done I looked at it again and realized I was being dumb and over thinking it (face palm).

Just add stop(true) before every animate and you should achieve the effect you are looking for:

$(".property-wrapper").hover(function (e) {
    console.debug('fire');
    var lines = new Array();
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-top"));
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-left"));
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-right"));
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-bottom-right"));
    lines.push($(this).find(".line-bottom-left"));

    if (e.type == "mouseenter") {
        $(lines[0]).stop(true).animate({
            width: "100%",
            left: 0
        }, 'fast', function () {
            $(lines[1]).stop(true).animate({
                height: "100%"
            }, 'slow', function () {
                $(lines[4]).stop(true).animate({
                    width: "50%"
                }, 'slow');
            });
            $(lines[2]).stop(true).animate({
                height: "100%"
            }, 'slow', function () {
                $(lines[3]).stop(true).animate({
                    width: "50%"
                }, 'slow');
            });
        });
    } else {
        // Reverse the animation on mouseenter
        $(lines[3]).stop(true).animate({
            width: 0
        }, 'fast', function () {
            $(lines[2]).stop(true).animate({
                height: 0
            }, 'slow', function () {
                $(lines[0]).stop(true).animate({
                    width: 0,
                    left: "50%"
                }, 'fast');
            });
        });

        $(lines[4]).stop(true).animate({
            width: 0
        }, 'fast', function () {
            $(lines[1]).stop(true).animate({
                height: 0
            }, 'slow');
        });
    }
});

It is important to note however that my super over thought answer is a bit more responsive and does not have a few edge case 'glitches' that I see in the answer I officially posted. But in its own right it is a bit quirky. I am sure somewhere in the middle you will find the solution you are looking for.

EDIT:

In my over thought solution I ended up adding one more level of over thinking and surprisingly I have come very close to a real solution.

Basically I figured out that in my over thought solution I had the queue's managed correctly, the only problem was that if the events fired too quickly, you could end up queuing things out of sequence.

That is to say the animation needs to be thought less of a set of animations but a single animation. Once you breach that mental barrier it becomes obvious that you need to put limiting criteria into when the animations should be queued.

So I re-tooled the animation to make sure parts of it were absolutely loaded before other parts could be loaded. This works really well until someone starts spazzing with the mouse. As long as the mouseenter and mouseexit events don't happen literally within a fraction of a second of one another, then the animation works as expected.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey! Thanks mate, this worked quite well. Although, still a bit buggy as some fast switching between elements makes a line here or there stop completely. I do think, however, that I might delay the effect until the mouse has been hovering for X milliseconds, as I do not want it to appear immediatly.. I think. I will for now mark this answer as accepted, as it works generally, but still has its bugs. –  Oyvind Andersson Mar 7 '13 at 16:32
    
yeah I tried to wrok the kinks out of it but was not successful. That was the reason for my super over thought answer. I was trying to make sure that fast switching was not going to bugger the queue but was not successful. I am still trying to figure it out though and I think I have a good idea ;) –  Pow-Ian Mar 7 '13 at 16:39
    
Nice mate! Be sure to post back here if (one of us) comes up with a good solution. Who knows, maybe someone else beats us to it ;) –  Oyvind Andersson Mar 7 '13 at 18:45
    
I think I am getting closer, now I have a bug where if the user mouses over and out too quickly the animation may not complete. –  Pow-Ian Mar 7 '13 at 19:50
    
That is as close As I can get. I am just out of ideas. –  Pow-Ian Mar 7 '13 at 20:33
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