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I'm creating web game where 3 images will be displayed on screen and the user will have to click on the image that matches the word (which is also on screen)

So far I have made a JavaScript array of the images and the words (populated from a database) and have managed to print 3 random images from the array on screen in 3 separate divs.

At the moment I am really struggling to print a word out at the same time as the 3 images that 'belongs' to one of the random images that have been printed on screen.

Here is my current code :-

 <script>
  var items = [
  <?php
  $con = mysql_connect("localhost","*****","******");
  if (!$con) {
    die('Could not connect: ' . mysql_error());
  }
  mysql_select_db("learning_game", $con);
  $result = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM data");
  $first = true;


  while ($row = mysql_fetch_array($result)) {
    if (!$first) {
      echo ",";
    }
    $first = false;
    echo "{name:'" . $row['word'] . "',image:'" . $row['image'] ."'}";
}
  mysql_close($con);
  ?>    
  ];
for (var i = 0; i < items.length; i += 1) {

  }  

   document.write("<br /> <br /> <br />");





 console.log(items);
 top.items = items;

 var images = new Array();
  var list = document.getElementsByTagName('div')[0];
   for(i = 0; i < 3; i++) {

         // Choose a random item and remove it from the array
       var item = items.splice(Math.floor(Math.random() * items.length), 1)[0];

      // Create the image element and set its src attribute
       images[i] = document.createElement('img');
        images[i].src = item.image;

      // Add it to your container element
   }

       document.getElementById("one").appendChild(images[0]);
       document.getElementById("two").appendChild(images[1]);
        document.getElementById("three").appendChild(images[2]);

     </script>

I hope to have 4 divs altogether, 1 div per image and the last div for the word that links/belongs to one of the images.

The JavaScript Array Looks like this :-

    var items = [
        {name:'Coch',image:'upload/coch.png'},                                                                           {name:'Glas',image:'upload/glas.png'},
        {name:'Melyn',image:'upload/melyn.png'},{name:'Ci',image:'upload/dog.jpg'},
        {name:'Cath',image:'upload/cath.jpg'},{name:'Gwyrdd',image:'upload/gwyrdd.png'},
        {name:'Un',image:'upload/un.jpg'},{name:'Dau',image:'upload/dau.jpg'},
        {name:'Tri',image:'upload/tri.jpg'},{name:'Bochdew',image:'upload/bochdew.jpg'},
        {name:'Piws',image:'upload/piws.png'}      ];

name being the 'word'. image being the link to the image in the file system.

Any help would be great, thank you in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Good job on a well-written question that provides all the basic essential parts and shows some effort. Thank you for trying to make it possible for us to answer you (we're not even asking for easy, just possible). –  ErikE Mar 6 '13 at 17:58
    
Thank You. I do try and ask clear questions as after all people like yourself are on here spending time answering questions for people and asking for nothing in return. Its the least people can do. –  user2043964 Mar 6 '13 at 18:19
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Instead of using splice or modifying the original array, why not just store the index of the randomly-selected item into a new array (after making sure it wasn't already selected)?

Also, instead of having a container for each image, why not just let them flow one after the other (of course I don't really know what you are ultimately trying to do)?

Here is a function that demonstrates this. See this in action in a JS Fiddle or interact with the full-screen result.

(My apologies for using jQuery if you don't want to do that; it was simply easier for me to get you a working demo by using a library.)

function imageReset() {
   var selected, img,
      imageContainer = $('#images').empty();
   currentImages = [];
   while (currentImages.length < 3) {
      selected = Math.floor(Math.random() * items.length);
      if (currentImages.indexOf(selected) === -1) {
         currentImages.push(selected);
      }
   }
   selectedImage = currentImages[Math.floor(Math.random() * 3)];
   $('#word').empty().html(items[selectedImage].name);
   $.each(currentImages, function(i, imageIndex) {
       img = $('<img>').attr({
           src: items[imageIndex].image,
           width: "200",
           height: "200"
       });
       if (imageIndex === selectedImage) {
          img.data('correct', true);
       }
       img.appendTo(imageContainer).on('click', imageClick);
   });
}

Here's a preview of what the final page looks like:

Image Recognizer JS Fiddle

Notes about not using a library:

  • The trickiest part will be determining if the correct image was clicked on. You can do that using an expando attribute such as "data-correct", but this may be hard to do cross-browser. I used jQuery's data storage, ala data(). You could also, instead of marking the image specially as the selected one, check the 'src' of the image itself and then using this, loop through the currentImages array to find which original item it is and whether it is the right one.
  • $.each() loops through an array. You can do fine with for (i = 0, l = arr.length; i < l; i += 1) {}.
  • empty() removes all the contents of an element. You can simply delete the first child until there are no children left.
  • $('<img>') does the same thing as createElement('img').

I highly recommend using a library. I cannot see a single reason to avoid one besides "I just want to". You can still learn the plain javascript methods even when using a library, by studying the underlying code. Frankly, if I were a software development business owner, I would require my junior javascript programmers to use the library because the coding speed and quality would be so much higher. They could and maybe should eventually learn how to do it the "old fashioned" way, but in the meantime I would not want them to waste time.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank You so much for the great example! I was not planning on using a library but it looks great. I will start work now working out what the code actually does now so it's clear in my mind. Thanks Again! –  user2043964 Mar 7 '13 at 1:18
    
You're welcome. If my code has helped you, would you please use the vote up or "select answer" tools to the left of my answer. Also, please see my (soon) update on some details around avoiding the library. May I ask why you don't want to use a library? It makes your production of a finished product faster, and produces a more reliable solution that works across more browsers. –  ErikE Mar 7 '13 at 2:29
    
I have no problem with libraries, in fact I have used jQuery in my website already. My only issue was I like to know what all the code means. As you have explained it everything makes sense now, thanks a lot. –  user2043964 Mar 7 '13 at 13:18
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Just create a new array names and add the three names to it when you pick your images. Then use the same random code to pick one of them.

…
var names = new Array()
…
    images[i].src = item.image;
    names[i] = item.name;
…
var name_to_display = names[Math.floor(Math.random() * 3)];
share|improve this answer
    
First of all thank you for your reply. Let me just get this clear in my mind. Create a new array of the names taken from the 3 random images done in my current code and then append the word to the div? Thank You for any replies. –  user2043964 Mar 6 '13 at 18:40
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