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Boost::optional (1.51) provides a way of constructing objects that is very dangerous for my users and that i'd like to prevent. Let's say I have my own integer class and I want to pass an optional such integer and store it in some class:

class myint {
public:
    int m_a;
    myint (int r_a) : m_a(r_a) {
    }
};

struct myclass {
    boost::optional<myint> content;
    myclass (const boost::optional<myint>& arg) : content(arg) {
    }
};

and now, here's how users would use the class:

myclass(myint(13));            //correct use
myclass(boost::none);          //correct use
myclass(myint(0));             //correct use
myclass(0);                    //INCORRECT use, this easy typo
                               //equates boost::none which
                               //is not what the user meant

i'd like to understand what is going on here and prevent this behaviour. Thanks


Interestingly,

myclass(1);              //does not compile

edit: boost::none is totally a valid value for my field, but having a boost::none sneak-up when the user is trying to type in a 0 is horrendously misleading and dangerous.

The intent might be a bit hidden since I'm not really rolling out a myint class and I don't really have a class myclass that serves little to no purpose. Anyways I need to send 10 or so optional ints to a function and deduping wouldn't work. (you can imagine I asked you your age, your height and your wealth and that there's three special buttons to check if you don't want to answer a question)


Edit: I've posted an answer that seems to work below (built from Mooing's Duck & Ilonesmiz suggestion, but lighter). I'm happy to hear comments about it though.

share|improve this question
3  
Ouch, seriously? That's quite annoying :( . –  us2012 Mar 6 '13 at 18:02
    
want you allow boost::none itself? –  RiaD Mar 6 '13 at 18:03
1  
@GurgHackpof: if it happens with 0, but not with 1, that means it thinks 0 is the NULL pointer, which means it's being constructed with a pointer constructor. A quick check confirms that none_t is a pointer type, so yeah, it's using boost::none_t. –  Mooing Duck Mar 6 '13 at 18:14
1  
@Gurg Yeah, I understand your problem. I was saying that I'm unhappy with the boost designers for making this possible (Although I have to admit I don't have a better implementation myself.) –  us2012 Mar 6 '13 at 18:16
1  
@Ilonesmiz: I understand this, but blowing up at compilation is not a bad solution for me: dev are forced to adapt but at least they're not caught unaware –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 7 '13 at 13:47

4 Answers 4

Do not let the constructor take a boost::optional I would do something like this instead.

struct myclass {
    boost::optional<myint> content;
    myclass () = default;
    explicit myclass(const myint& int_):content(int_){}
};

However when I am thinking about it I am not completely clear on what you are trying to achieve and what you want to avoid happening. What is the purpose of the optional member?

share|improve this answer
1  
see edit above. boost::none is definitely a valid value. –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 6 '13 at 18:18
    
Even with a none_t overload, this still doesn't work :( –  Mooing Duck Mar 6 '13 at 18:41
1  
Why do you have to allow boost::none? Why not just allow myclass() or myclass(17). I am still missing the intent, what are you trying to accomplish and why? Maybe there is a better way to achieve what you want. –  AxelOmega Mar 6 '13 at 18:48
1  
@MooingDuck,@AxelOmega : the intent might be a bit hidden since i'm not really rolling out an int class and I don't really have a class myclass that serves little to no purpose. Anyways I need to send 10 or so optional ints to a function and deduping the way you suggest wouldn't work. (you can imagine I asked you your age, your height and your wealth and that there's three special buttons to check if you don't want to answer a question) –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 6 '13 at 18:53
1  
Maybe boost::parameter can help you out. Only pass the parameters that you name. The rest default to boost::none_t (boost.org/doc/libs/1_53_0/libs/parameter/doc/html/index.html) –  AxelOmega Mar 6 '13 at 18:59

This is uglier than I like, but it seems to address your concerns. It works by forwarding the argument given to myclass perfectly to a pair of functions that take either an int or a boost::none_t, bypassing the implicit user-defined constructor. This works because 0 matches int better than boost::none_t, and an implicit user-defined constructor is the worst match.

class myint {
public:
    int m_a;
    myint (int r_a) : m_a(r_a) {}
};    
boost::optional<myint> myintctor(int arg) {return myint(arg);}
boost::optional<myint> myintctor(boost::none_t arg) {return arg;}

struct myclass {
    boost::optional<myint> content0;
    boost::optional<myint> content1;
    boost::optional<myint> content2;

    template<class T0, class T1, class T2>
    myclass(const T0& a0, const T1& a1, const T2& a2) 
    :content0(myintctor(a0)), content1(myintctor(a1)), content2(myintctor(a2))
    {}
};

Proof of concept. Modern compilers ought to be smart enough to elide the copy, but that shouldn't matter for an int.

share|improve this answer
    
mmh, that is smart indeed! However This is still a bit annoying since I can totally see myself forgetting to pull out this trick for the next function I write. works though! –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 6 '13 at 19:01
    
@GurgHackpof: Really, this should only occur for boost::optional<T> where T has a user-defined constructor that accepts 0. 90% of the time you shouldn't need this trick. –  Mooing Duck Mar 6 '13 at 19:03
    
you're missing a copy constructor (see edit above) but I'll go with that.Thanks! –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 7 '13 at 8:43
    
Sorry man, I flagged that as an answer before noticing that it is not one. Problem is: Ì can't forward an existing boost::optional<myint> through this kind of structure. Look at my edit to the question and the attached example. –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 7 '13 at 10:05
1  
@GurgHackpof I haven't tested it thoroughly, but changing boost::optional<myint> myintctor(boost::none_t arg) {return arg;} with boost::optional<myint> myintctor(boost::optional<myint> arg) {return arg;} seems to work. –  user1252091 Mar 7 '13 at 11:58

I guess the problem is only meaningful for optional int. One solution could be to provide two constructors:

myclass() : content(boost::none) {}
myclass(myint input) : content(input) {}

It's true that you lose a bit the advantage of boost::optional...

share|improve this answer
    
It's really not a solution. if you've got to pass two of these guys you would need 4 constructors and so on. I have a function with 10 parameters or so so this would quickly become unmanageable. –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 6 '13 at 18:27
    
@GurgHackpof: I don't think there's any other solution. 0 implicitly converts to boost::none_t, and there's nothing any of us can do about that. –  Mooing Duck Mar 6 '13 at 18:44
    
@Mooing Duck: thanks for trying but I'm not all that happy with throwing the towel! (could roll out my own optional class, but that would be a pain) –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 6 '13 at 18:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This code (Inspired from Ilonesmiz) seems to do the job fine and is a bit lighter than the approach from Mooing Duck but still uses the magic templating trick.

struct myprotectedclass {
    boost::optional<myint> content;

    template <class T>
    myprotectedclass(const T& a) :content(boost::optional<myint>(a)) {}


};

Here is the proof.
When C++ sees the 0, it thinks "hmm, this is probably an int, but it might be a pointer to something!" (only for 0, no other numbers) But if you pass that 0 to a function, it must decide on a type, and so it picks the default of int. Whereas, in the original, a 0 was passed to a function expecting a myint or a pointer (boost::none_t is a pointer). 0 isn't a myint, but it can be a pointer, so it was picking that one.

share|improve this answer
1  
I see your proof, but I don't understand it. From my understanding of the code, this shouldn't change anything. From my understanding of your test, nothing appears changed. With myclass a(0); it did not contain a value. With myprotectedclass b(0), that also did not contain a value. I fail to see any difference –  Mooing Duck Mar 7 '13 at 17:52
    
I added more explanations to my answer to explain why and how it works. –  Mooing Duck Mar 7 '13 at 17:55
    
@MooingDuck: Right, I messed up in the test, which pushed me into believing that folding in the template was working. Look at the code above (that I edited and I obviously fixed the test) and you'll understand why i did this mistake. The current one DOES work. –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 7 '13 at 18:45
    
@MooingDuck: re-edited & simplified. still working. –  Gurg Hackpof Mar 7 '13 at 18:57
2  
When C++ sees 0, it thinks "hmm, this is probably an int, but it might be a pointer to something!" (only for 0, no other numbers) But if you pass that 0 to a function, it must decide on a type, and so it picks the default of int. Whereas, in the original, you passed it to a function expecting a myint or a pointer (boost::none_t is a pointer). 0 isn't a myint, but it can be a pointer, so it picked that one. –  Mooing Duck Mar 7 '13 at 19:09

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