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I'm trying to figure out how my event storage and my read model are related in terms of actual nuts and bolts implementations.

My limited understanding of the event store leads me to believe:

  1. Event is committed to event store
  2. Dispatcher runs
  3. If I'm using a queue, I send the message to a queue (lets say mass transit)
  4. My read model is subscribed to the queue, so my read database gets the message (mysql)
  5. My read model is updated with the new change to my data

This would mean that if anything happened to mass transit, my read database will be out of sync and I have to figure out how to sync it back.

Some stuff I've read/watched that's been published by greg young suggest using the event store itself as a queue, and maintain consistency by keeping an auto increment number on the event store side in order to maintain eventual consistency. I'm wondering if that is implemented in joliver's project?

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so my read database gets the message (mysql)

I'd re-state that as "my event processor(s) for a given event get the message and (in my case) will typically manipulate state in a mysql database" (Or do you mean something else?).

This would mean that if anything happened to mass transit, my read database will be out of sync and I have to figure out how to sync it back.

Yes, your queue becomes part of the state of your app and it needs to be backed up and resilient. Note that the Dispatcher does not mark the Commit dispatched until it has successfully put it onto the Queue, and the queuing system won't remove the message until you've confirmed completion of the processing to do the necessary updates to sync the state in your Read Model.

Remember that you can consider multiple web service calls to all be part of the necessary work to process an event.

The other thing to bear in mind is that you'll want to have your event processors be idempotent (i.e. be able to handle At Least Once delivery).

Further down the line, you'll have fun considering what you're going to do if an event cannot complete processing - are you going to Dead Letter the message? Who is going to monitor that?

BTW depending on your hosting arrangements, Azure (or the on-premise Windows) ServiceBus might be worth considering)

Some stuff I've read/watched that's been published by greg young suggest using the event store itself as a queue, and maintain consistency by keeping an auto increment number on the event store side in order to maintain eventual consistency. I'm wondering if that is implemented in joliver's project?

No, JOES provides you a Dispatcher hook and you decide what's right for you after that. This is good and bad. There are systems that don't have a Dispatcher tied to a stateful Read Model at all - they simply query the Event Store for events and build an in-memory Read Model to short circuit all this.

Not sure what you mean by auto increment numbers.

Beware that the Projection stuff in the GES is not fully 1.0 yet (but it goes without saying its extremely deserving of your strong consideration - it intrinsically deals with the bulk of the concerns you're touching on with these questions)

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Yes, I meant the processors will get the message. I'll leave the OP the way it is since your clarification adds a level of clarification other newbies would appreciate. – ton.yeung Mar 7 '13 at 14:49

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