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I am writing a program for an assignment where a parent plays connect four against N child processes. The program uses pipes to communicate game moves between processes.

I am having a problem fixing a race condition that is present in my program, however. There is a condition where the child process hangs one its read() call after the game has finished. This only seems to happen when there is more than one child process.

I've tried several things, such as named semaphores, but I'm still pretty new to forks, pipes, and IPC. I've posted a gist with relevant code (I tried to clean it up as best as I can for readability) here:

Gist with relevant code

Any help would be greatly appreciated

EDIT

Here's the relevant source from the gist with the declarations added.

int main (int argc, char const *argv[])
{
  int dimension = 8, children = 2, i;
  int child_play_to_win = 0;
  int fd[children][4];
  pid_t childpid[children];
  Board** boards = (Board**) malloc(sizeof(Board*) * children);
  GameMove* lastMove, *tmpMove;
  char buf[80];
  for(i = 0; i < children; i++) {
     generate_board(&(boards[i]), dimension);
     int tmp[2];
     pipe(tmp);

    // child read
    fd[i][0] = dup(tmp[0]);
    // parent write
    fd[i][1] = dup(tmp[1]);

    pipe(tmp);
    // parent read
    fd[i][2] = dup(tmp[0]);
    // child write
    fd[i][3] = dup(tmp[1]);

        childpid[i] = fork();

    if(childpid[i] == -1) {
        perror("fork");
        exit(1);
    }
    if(childpid[i] == 0) {
      srand(getpid());
      close(fd[i][1]);
      close(fd[i][2]);
      while(!boards[i]->finished) {
        // Read in move from parent
        printf("child[%d] about to read\n", getpid());
        read(fd[i][0], &buf, sizeof(GameMove));

        // repeat parent move on this board

        if(gameNotFinished) {
          // make child move

          // write move back to parent

          write(fd[i][3], lastMove, sizeof(GameMove));

          // If the board is finished (there was a win),
          if (!gameNotFinihsed) {
            // Child wins
            close(fd[i][0]);
            close(fd[i][3]);
            printf("child[%d] ending\n", getpid()); 
            break;
          }
        }
        else {
          // Parent won
          close(fd[i][0]);
          close(fd[i][3]);
          break;
        } 
      }
    dealloc(boards[i]);
    exit(0);
    }
}

  // When this hits children amount, all games are done
  int games_complete = 0;
  // Make first move to all children
  for (i = 0; i < children; i++) {
    close(fd[i][0]);
    close(fd[i][3]);
    lastMove = placePieceAtBestPosition(boards[i], 1);
    printf("parent writing to child[%d]\n", childpid[i]);
    write(fd[i][1], lastMove, sizeof(GameMove));
  }
  while (games_complete != children) {
    for (i = 0; i < children; i++) {
      // Read move from child
      read(fd[i][2], &buf, sizeof(GameMove));

      // repeat child move

      // Check for a child win...
      if (!checkForWin(boards[i], 2)) {
        // No win yet, place piece at best position

        lastMove = placePieceAtBestPosition(boards[i], 1);

        // check for win again
        boards[i]->finished = checkForWin(boards[i], 1);
        // Write move back to child
        write(fd[i][1], lastMove, sizeof(GameMove));

        // If we won, close everything up and increment
        // the games_complete counter.
        if(boards[i]->finished) {
          close(fd[i][1]);
          close(fd[i][2]);
          games_complete++;
        }
      } else {
    // write back child move if there was a win
        write(fd[i][1], lastMove, sizeof(GameMove));
        close(fd[i][1]);
        close(fd[i][2]);
        printf("Parent lost! ):\n");
        games_complete++;
      }
    }
  }
share|improve this question
2  
Please post (relevant parts of) code directly in your question, not via a link. Thanks. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 6 '13 at 18:17
    
First thing that hits me is that you don't need those dup calls after creating the pipes. Especially since you don't close the original file descriptors. Depending on how many child processes you make, this might fill up the file descriptor table. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 6 '13 at 18:19
    
Why would you link 100+ lines of code, and not include the opening function declaration at the top of the source file? –  WhozCraig Mar 6 '13 at 18:19
    
Sorry, thought it would make the question more readable. @WhozCraig My apologies, I was trying to just put in the relevant portion. The edit includes the beginning of main. I never really know how much or how little code to post here... –  Christian Benincasa Mar 6 '13 at 18:24
    
And you must check the returned value from yourread calls. The will return 0 when they should be closed, or -1 on error. –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 6 '13 at 18:25

1 Answer 1

I think I know what your problem is. When you fork each child, you close the parent side of its pipes. however, each child still has open the parent side of the pipes for all of the previous children. Because of this, only the last-created child will have its parent-sides of its pipes closed.

Suggest you change:

close(fd[i][1]);
close(fd[i][2]);

to something like:

for (j = 0; j <=i; j++) {
  close(fd[j][1]);
  close(fd[j][2]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Good catch. I'm still getting hangs on the child read, but this is definitely something I missed. –  Christian Benincasa Mar 6 '13 at 19:14

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