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In the past few days I've been reading about the differences betweeen properties and methods in C# and when use each. Most of the articles/questions I read says that getters should be "light" and never have large amount of logic or complex operations inside.

Right now I have a get that I think is on the line between property and method, so I would like to see what you all think, if I should change to method or stay with the getter.

Also any other advice is welcome :D

public decimal[] getPreprocData
{
    get
    {
        int i = 3;
        decimal[] data = new decimal[9];

        data[0] = (start.Value.Hour * 3600) + (start.Value.Minute * 60);
        data[1] = duration.Value;
        data[2] = flowRate.Value;

        foreach (NumericUpDown nud in gbHTF.Controls.OfType<NumericUpDown>().OrderBy(nud => nud.TabIndex))
        {
            data[i] = nud.Value;
            i++;
        }

        return data;
    }
}
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closed as off topic by Servy, hatchet, BenSwayne, Mario, Linger Mar 6 '13 at 20:36

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This really belongs on codereview.stackexchange –  Servy Mar 6 '13 at 18:57
1  
Code Analysis should complain about returning an array from a property. You're also not following the BCL naming conventions. –  Dan Mar 6 '13 at 19:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Properties & Field are generally Noun and methods & functions are generally Verb.

so, getPreprocData should be a method. Since it respresnt an action on instance of the object (class).


From my own point of view, since your property is never making use of the setter, it is always better to use method than property.

What is the point of having a property when there is nothing to set.?


You property can be implemented as method as :

public decimal[] GetPreprocData()
{
        int i = 3;
        decimal[] data = new decimal[9];

        data[0] = (start.Value.Hour * 3600) + (start.Value.Minute * 60);
        data[1] = duration.Value;
        data[2] = flowRate.Value;

        foreach (NumericUpDown nud in gbHTF.Controls.OfType<NumericUpDown>().OrderBy(nud => nud.TabIndex))
        {
            data[i] = nud.Value;
            i++;
        }

        return preprocData;
}
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Seems like everybody agrees that i should convert the property into a method, so i'll do that. Thank you! :D –  Kitinz Mar 6 '13 at 19:07
    
Should definitely be a method. Not sure whether you should prefix it with "get" though. If the result is something you would always assign to something, it should have a noun for a name even though it's a method, otherwise it just reads wrong. It'd be like calling Math.Sin(), Math.GetSin(), or calling Random.Next(), Random.GetNext() and so on. –  Matthew Watson Mar 6 '13 at 19:12

This looks like something that should indeed be a method.

You are doing a bit of initialization, and the size of gbHTF.Controls is unbounded, so this may end up being expensive.

It is also hiding behind a property name that doesn't actually describe what you are doing - this would be better as a descriptive method.

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The right rule-of-thumb is that a property should perform about the same as a field; of course, "about the same as" is subjective. You would probably not be satisfying expectations for a property if it was 100-times slower than a field; 2-10 times slower might be reasonable.

Note that's subtlety different than the lack of extensive logic or complex operations you mention. Certainly, including such code increases the likelihood that a properly will perform slowly; but that's not necessarily always true.

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Convert it into a method. There's processing and business logic in there.

Generally, I'd limit properties to formatting or combining of other properties, just so you have a clear separation of concerns.

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