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I wish to select a set of rows from a data frame in R given multiple parameters. Normally this could be done using an OR statement, however the values are housed in an array. I am querying them as such (and with no luck):

Some data to get us rolling:

x = array(c(1,2,3),c(5,5))
y=c(1,2)

The command I'm presently using is (filtering by column 1):

x[x[,1] == y, ]

The above command yields this error:

Warning message:
In x[, i] == y :
  longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length

Which makes sense. I just don't know how to get around it.

What I am looking for is:

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    3    2    1    3
[2,]    2    1    3    2    1
[3,]    1    3    2    1    3
[4,]    2    1    3    2    1

Thanks in advance for the help!

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are looking for %in%.

> x[x[,1] %in% y, ]

#     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
# [1,]    1    3    2    1    3
# [2,]    2    1    3    2    1
# [3,]    1    3    2    1    3
# [4,]    2    1    3    2    1

As @Ricardo said under comment, to explain better as to why this is happening. When you equate x[,1] to y, you get:

x[,1] == y
[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE

Since y is 1,2 it just equates that to x[, 1] and since both of them match, returns TRUE. Since the length of output must equal length(x[, 1]), the rest is "recycled" (y = 1, 2, 1 against x = 3, 1, 2) which results in FALSE. But now, if you use x[., ] to fetch the rows, only the first two values are TRUE. So, only the first two will be picked. Using `%in% results in:

x[,1] %in% y
# [1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

Which is what you expect.

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the parenthetical comment may not be very clear –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 6 '13 at 19:16
    
Worked like a charm. Thanks! –  cranberry Mar 6 '13 at 19:28
    
@RicardoSaporta, thanks, edited. –  Arun Mar 6 '13 at 19:55
    
great! But to clarify, if two vectors are different sizes, the rest are not filled in as FALSE. The shorter is recycled. It just so happens in this example that there are no further positive matches. (ie what is actually happening at the end is a comparison: c(3 == 1, 1==2, 2==1), which are all FALSE. –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 6 '13 at 20:39
    
I elaborated on this below. -RS –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 6 '13 at 20:41
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To add to @Arun's answer, if the two vectors being compared are of different sizes, R wil recycle the shorter one so that R is comparing two vectors of the same size, and then it makes a pair-wise comparison. (ie compares the first element of each vector, then the second element of eac vector, etc).

It does not, for example, compare the first element of vector one against all of the elements in vector two. (for that you need %in% as @Arun mentioned)

For example, take a look at the following. The first two examples yield equivalent output

> c(0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2) == c(1, 2)
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

> c(0, 1, 2, 0, 1, 2) == c(1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2)
[1] FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE

The comparisons being made are:

 #  element#   LHS     RHS   areEqual
 #     1.       0       1      FALSE   <~~ Notice that the '0' from LHS is being compared with the '1' from RHS
 #     2.       1       2      FALSE  
 #     3.       2       1      FALSE
 #     4.       0       2      FALSE
 #     5.       1       1       TRUE
 #     6.       2       2       TRUE

Here is another example, with the LHS "shifted" relative to the previous example.

> c(1, 2, 0, 1, 2, 0) == c(1, 2)
[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE

Note what happens when the shorter vector is not an exact multiple of the longer element. (ie, 2 does not go into 7).
The recylcing still occurs, but a portion of the shorter vector gets cropped from the last recycle.
R gives us a warning, just in case we did not expect them to be different sizes

> c(1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 0) == c(1, 2)
[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE  TRUE  TRUE FALSE
Warning message:
In c(1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 0) == c(1, 2) :
  longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length

Notice that it does not matter if the longer vector is on the RHS or LHS; the recycling works just the same

> c(1, 2) == c(1, 2, 0, 1, 2, 0)
[1]  TRUE  TRUE FALSE FALSE FALSE FALSE
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