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I have private pdb file and I have to convert it to a public one. Is there tool for it?

Thank you in advance.

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There are several types of pdb files (e.g. Palm database) - which one do you mean? –  Mark Oct 6 '09 at 13:48
    
Created by visual studio 8 –  msh Oct 6 '09 at 13:57
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can create a stripped pdb file that doesn't contain; Type information, Line number information, Per-object file CodeView symbols such as those for functions, locals, and static data. See the /PDBSTRIPPED compiler option.

EDIT: There does appear to be a utility that is part of the DDK that can convert a full symbol file to a stripped symbol file it is called BinPlace the forum I found the information on suggested there might be problems with certain versions of the utility so be warned (forum article).

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Unfortunately, rebuilding is not an option. I have to strip it from an existing symbol file. –  msh Oct 7 '09 at 5:20
    
Thank you that's what I was looking for. –  msh Oct 8 '09 at 5:48
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Use PDBCopy.
pdbcopy is part of the Debugging Tools for Windows which is available through the Windows SDK

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Huh? .pdb files contain debug information - there's nothing private or public about them. If you want to distributed it, do so. However, normally they're not distributed.

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Public pdb files can be released with your product. Microsoft, Citrix and others do this. You would never release the private pdb files (unless under NDA) hence the need for the public versions. Customer regularly ask us for them do they can self diagnose issues. –  MrBry Feb 27 '12 at 14:22
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