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I have some strings like:

Sample Input:

Also known as temple of the city,
xxx as Pune Banglore as kolkata Delhi India,
as Mumbai India or as Bombay India,
Calcutta,India is now know as Kolkata,India,

From the above I want to convert as xxx xxxx xx, to as xxx_xxxx_xx, and it should be effective after the last as.

Sample output for above:

Also known as temple_of_the_city,
xxx as Pune Banglore as kolkata_Delhi_India,
as Mumbai India or as Bombay_India,
Calcutta,India is now know as Kolkata,India,

There should be no space separated string after the last as in a line.

Please let me know if it is not clear. Thanks

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Where did the second xxx in the second line of output come from? –  Lev Levitsky Mar 6 '13 at 19:51
    
Sorry Lev, I have edited it. –  pkawar Mar 6 '13 at 19:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Paul is right that it's not really a simple task. This is a sed solution that I put together:

sed 's/\(.*as \)/\1\n/;h;y/ /_/;G;s/.*\n\(.*\)\n\(.*\)\n.*/\2\1/' file.txt

Demonstration on your data:

$ echo 'Also known as temple of the city,
> xxx as Pune Banglore as kolkata Delhi India,
> as Mumbai India or as Bombay India,
> Calcutta,India is now know as Kolkata,India,' | \
> sed 's/\(.*as \)/\1\n/;h;y/ /_/;G;s/.*\n\(.*\)\n\(.*\)\n.*/\2\1/'
Also known as temple_of_the_city,
xxx as Pune Banglore as kolkata_Delhi_India,
as Mumbai India or as Bombay_India,
Calcutta,India is now know as Kolkata,India,
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@zzk echo "She has as long as two hours" | sed 's/\(.*as \)/\1\n/;h;y/ /_/;G;s/.*\n\(.*\)\n\(.*\)\n.*/\2\1/' does work for me on GNU sed. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 6 '13 at 20:20
    
perhaps some subtle thing changed when i copy it into my terminal. anyhow. –  zzk Mar 6 '13 at 20:22
    
@zzk If you're on Mac by any chance, that would explain it. sed works differently in OS X. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 6 '13 at 20:24
    
Thanks Lev, it is working for me at now.I am familiar to basic sed so, Could please suggest, from where should I get the details about ;h;y and G; options. –  pkawar Mar 6 '13 at 20:43
    
@pkawar First of all, read man sed which gives one-line descriptions for those; second of all, I'd recommend this reference. –  Lev Levitsky Mar 6 '13 at 20:48

I'd be inclined to use Perl, the swiss army chainsaw, but sed is also an option. In either case you're looking at a substantial learning curve.

The replacement you've described is probably complex enough that you'd be better off writing a script rather than trying to do it as a one liner.

If you're going to write a script and don't already know Perl there's no reason why you shouldn't pick your scripting language of choice (python, ruby, etc) as long as it has some sort of text pattern matching syntax.

I don't know of a simple, shallow learning curve method of doing a complex pattern match and replacement of this sort. Is this a one time thing where you need to do this replacement only? Or are you going to be doing similar sorts of complicated pattern replacements in the future. If you're going to be doing this frequently you really should invest the time in learning some scripting language but I won't impose my Perl bias on you. Just pick any language that seems accessible.

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