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So I am trying to utilize a simple logging function throughout all my files in my C# project. (visual studio 2010) I have made this project in vb.net, now I am trying to rewrite it and clean it up in c#. I am also new to C#, so apologies in advance.

In vb.net it was pretty simple:

  • create a .vb file
  • put it in the libraries folder in the project
  • then in any file you want to use methods in the library file, at the top put "Imports ."

Fantastic, only c# doesn't seem to allow this. I tried "using ." but intellisense only lets me put "using .Library" where library is the name of the folder the class is under.

After some googling and researching it seems like C# doesn't allow for global methods, which I think is a generally discouraged practice anyway.

The logging method has input parameters of what file to write to and what the message to be appended is. It's not terribly long but I feel like it's a waste to re-write the code in every class I want to use it in.

I could create an instance of said utils class in the classes that use it, but I didn't need to do this in vb.net. (just import and then the method was available to use)

So am I just splitting hairs here or is there an easy way to do this that I'm not seeing or don't know of?

Thanks!

EDIT: Code added due to request

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

namespace ProjectProgram.Library
{
    public class ApplicationUtilities
    {

    public string homeLogPath = System.Environment.ExpandEnvironmentVariables("%SystemRoot%\\System32\\folderName\\Logs");

    public void toLogFile(string LogName, string logEntry)
    {

        string LogFile = homeLogPath + "\\" + LogName;
        if (!File.Exists(LogFile))
        {
            File.WriteAllText(LogFile, string.Empty, Encoding.UTF8);
        }

        File.AppendAllText(LogFile, DateTime.Now + " " + logEntry + "\n");

    }

}
}

This is the code I want to use in another class. How can I call the toLogFile method from another class?

share|improve this question
3  
You are trying to create a static method. Likely reason C# isn't liking you VB attempt is because it's not seeing the method as having appropriate scope. – Sparksis Mar 6 '13 at 20:00
1  
You should really add some of the code of what you've tried, because I'd love to answer this question, but I don't really understand it your problem without any code. – antonijn Mar 6 '13 at 20:02
    
post your code. – HighCore Mar 6 '13 at 20:02
    
I posted the code. – APIandSDK Mar 6 '13 at 20:24
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Make your logging class and it's methods public static and include it in all the files you want to use it. Then you can access it simply by doing something like

  Logger.WriteLine("log message");

Or just use a library like Log4Net http://logging.apache.org/log4net/

share|improve this answer
    
It's not as clean as it was in vb.net but this definitely is what I want or the closest thing I can think of. Static restricts the use of class variables though. I cannot reference the homeLogPath I declare in my utils class. Obviously I can move it inside the method. I think this will do for now. Thanks! – APIandSDK Mar 6 '13 at 20:31

Your utilities class should look something like:

namespace Code.Utilities{
    public class MyUtilities{

        public static void LogString(string input){
            //Do something
        }
    }
}

Then any other class that wants to use LogString() will look similar to:

using Code.Utilities;    

namespace SomeSpace{
     public class SomeClass{
         public void F(string input){
             MyUtilities.LogString(input);
         }
     }    
}
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