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I am using ASP.NET MVC 4 SimpleMembership "out of the box".

I set the authentication requirement as deco on the controllers with [Authorize(Roles = "User")].

It works fine, except when leaving the website without logging out. The next time I come back, Request.IsAuthenticated is still true, but when I go to a view, I get "A network-related or instance-specific error occurred while establishing a connection to SQL." In fact, it looks like it is trying to connect to a local database: "SQLExpress database file auto-creation error' - in the App_Data folder. But I have no connection string that points to this, it is all on Azure Sql.

Any idea what this is? And why does it pretend to stay logged in? And why the attempt to create a database?

------------------------------------Stack trace-------------------------------------------

[SqlException (0x80131904): A network-related or instance-specific error occurred while establishing a connection to SQL Server. The server was not found or was not accessible. Verify that the instance name is correct and that SQL Server is configured to allow remote connections. (provider: SQL Network Interfaces, error: 26 - Error Locating Server/Instance Specified)]
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlInternalConnection.OnError(SqlException exception, Boolean breakConnection, Action`1 wrapCloseInAction) +5296071
   System.Data.SqlClient.TdsParser.ThrowExceptionAndWarning(TdsParserStateObject stateObj, Boolean callerHasConnectionLock, Boolean asyncClose) +558
   System.Data.SqlClient.TdsParser.Connect(ServerInfo serverInfo, SqlInternalConnectionTds connHandler, Boolean ignoreSniOpenTimeout, Int64 timerExpire, Boolean encrypt, Boolean trustServerCert, Boolean integratedSecurity, Boolean withFailover) +5308555
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlInternalConnectionTds.AttemptOneLogin(ServerInfo serverInfo, String newPassword, SecureString newSecurePassword, Boolean ignoreSniOpenTimeout, TimeoutTimer timeout, Boolean withFailover) +145
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlInternalConnectionTds.LoginNoFailover(ServerInfo serverInfo, String newPassword, SecureString newSecurePassword, Boolean redirectedUserInstance, SqlConnectionString connectionOptions, SqlCredential credential, TimeoutTimer timeout) +889
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlInternalConnectionTds.OpenLoginEnlist(TimeoutTimer timeout, SqlConnectionString connectionOptions, SqlCredential credential, String newPassword, SecureString newSecurePassword, Boolean redirectedUserInstance) +307
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlInternalConnectionTds..ctor(DbConnectionPoolIdentity identity, SqlConnectionString connectionOptions, SqlCredential credential, Object providerInfo, String newPassword, SecureString newSecurePassword, Boolean redirectedUserInstance, SqlConnectionString userConnectionOptions) +434
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnectionFactory.CreateConnection(DbConnectionOptions options, DbConnectionPoolKey poolKey, Object poolGroupProviderInfo, DbConnectionPool pool, DbConnection owningConnection, DbConnectionOptions userOptions) +5311099
   System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionFactory.CreateNonPooledConnection(DbConnection owningConnection, DbConnectionPoolGroup poolGroup, DbConnectionOptions userOptions) +38
   System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionFactory.TryGetConnection(DbConnection owningConnection, TaskCompletionSource`1 retry, DbConnectionOptions userOptions, DbConnectionInternal& connection) +5313314
   System.Data.ProviderBase.DbConnectionClosed.TryOpenConnection(DbConnection outerConnection, DbConnectionFactory connectionFactory, TaskCompletionSource`1 retry, DbConnectionOptions userOptions) +143
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection.TryOpen(TaskCompletionSource`1 retry) +83
   System.Data.SqlClient.SqlConnection.Open() +96
   System.Web.Management.SqlServices.GetSqlConnection(String server, String user, String password, Boolean trusted, String connectionString) +76

[HttpException (0x80004005): Unable to connect to SQL Server database.]
   System.Web.Management.SqlServices.GetSqlConnection(String server, String user, String password, Boolean trusted, String connectionString) +131
   System.Web.Management.SqlServices.SetupApplicationServices(String server, String user, String password, Boolean trusted, String connectionString, String database, String dbFileName, SqlFeatures features, Boolean install) +89
   System.Web.Management.SqlServices.Install(String database, String dbFileName, String connectionString) +27
   System.Web.DataAccess.SqlConnectionHelper.CreateMdfFile(String fullFileName, String dataDir, String connectionString) +386
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2 Answers 2

It is using cookies to keep the user logged in if you are using SimpleMembership "out of the box" settings. SimpleMembership uses EF code-first and it will try to create a database if it does not think one is already present. It uses a lazy loading mechanism so it will not attempt to create it until you hit the AccountController (i.e. you are taken to the logon or registration page). You will be redirected to the logon page if authorization fails. If you are using "out of the box" setting then it wants to use the connection string in your web.config named DefaultConnection. It will look something like this

   <add name="DefaultConnection" connectionString="Data Source=(LocalDb)\v11.0;Initial Catalog=aspnet-ProjectName-20130125152904;Integrated Security=SSPI;AttachDBFilename=|DataDirectory|\aspnet-ProjectName-20130125152904.mdf" providerName="System.Data.SqlClient" />

Where ProjectName is the name of the MVC project when you first created it with the MVC 4 Internet template. You will want to change this to work with Azure.

Updated 3/7/2013 Since you are not using the default connection string you need to update which connections string to use in two places. You mention that you updated it in the initializer, so I am assuming you mean in the SimpleMembershipInitializer, which has code that looks like this.

    public SimpleMembershipInitializer()
    {
        Database.SetInitializer<UsersContext>(null);

        try
        {
            using (var context = new UsersContext())
            {
                if (!context.Database.Exists())
                {
                    // Create the SimpleMembership database without Entity Framework migration schema
                        ((IObjectContextAdapter)context).ObjectContext.CreateDatabase();
                }
            }

            WebSecurity.InitializeDatabaseConnection("DefaultConnection", "UserProfile", "UserId", "UserName", autoCreateTables: true);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("The ASP.NET Simple Membership database could not be initialized. For more information, please see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=256588", ex);
        }

I am assuming (since you did not provide any code in your question) that you updated the first parameter in the InitializeDatabaseConnection to use the name of your connection string. This is good but it only handles configuring the database connection. If you look at the code detecting whether the database is created and actually creating it is above setting this connection. The connection string is also set in the UserContext, which you will find in AccountModels.cs. The code for this is

public UsersContext()
    : base("DefaultConnection")
{
}

As you can see the connection string is passed to the base context. If you did not change it here then it will check for existence using the DefaultConnection connection string and try to create it. I believe if the connection string is missing it will try to create a local database called DefaultConnection.

If you are using forms authentication I would recommend ripping out the initializer and handle it yourself as described in this article. This initializer was designed so that the template generated code would work in case the developer did not want to use forms authentication.

share|improve this answer
    
I have a different connection string in web.config, one that points to my Azure database. The "DefaultConnection" is not there anymore. I have therefore changed the reference in initializer, so it points to the new connection string. Note that authentication works fine, if I log out and log in. But if I just close the browser and come back, then I have problems. –  Anders Mar 6 '13 at 20:29
    
Please see my updated answer that is based on the new information you provided on your comments. –  Kevin Junghans Mar 7 '13 at 17:07
    
Thank you for the update. The connection string in the UsersContext constructor is also set to the same connection string, and it is working just fine. Otherwise I would not be able to log on, which - as mentioned - is working perfectly fine. The problem is after a timeout, i.e. not logging out, and then going to a page that requires authentication. –  Anders Mar 7 '13 at 17:39

I finally figured out this problem! I was having the same problem when I found this thread, but since there was no definitive answer I had to poke around on my own.

What happens is that the UsersContext will eventually loose track of its connection. By bypassing the UserContext completely and avoiding the constructor, the connection will stay stable.

Note: I am not auto-generating the simple membership tables anymore so I am not sure if this will work out if that is the case.

See the UsersContext in the AccountModels.cs here. You should comment-out/delete this code.

public class UsersContext : DbContext
{
    public UsersContext()
        : base("YourDBContext")
    {
    }

    public DbSet<UserProfile> UserProfiles { get; set; }
    public DbSet<webpages_Membership> webpages_Memberships { get; set; }
    public DbSet<UsersInRole> webpages_UsersInRoles { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Role> webpages_Roles { get; set; }
}

Add the DbSets from UsersContext to your own context:

public class YourDBContext : DbContext
{
    public DbSet<Blah> Blahs{ get; set; }
    public DbSet<Something> Somethings { get; set; }

    public DbSet<UserProfile> UserProfiles { get; set; }
    public DbSet<webpages_Membership> webpages_Memberships { get; set; }
    public DbSet<UsersInRole> webpages_UsersInRoles { get; set; }
    public DbSet<Role> webpages_Roles { get; set; }

    protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder)
    {
        modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<PluralizingTableNameConvention>();
    }

}

Of course after you do all that you must change any references to the UsersContext into YourDBContext, i.e.

UsersContext uc = new UsersContext();

Becomes

YourDBContext ydb = new YourDBContext();

The added benefit of doing this is that you won't have to keep track of two different DBContexts.

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