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I have code that counts the number of occurrences of days of the week in a textfile. As of right now, it will only count the day of the week if it is the only string on that line. For example, if I have a line that says (Monday abcd) it will not count that Monday on the count. I tried to fix this using indexOf and by splitting, trimming, and adding back to the hashmap but I cant figure out how to do either.

Heres some of the code, before this I declare the keywords, open the textfile and put each keyword in the map with a value of zero

public class DayCounter
{

public static void main(String args[]) throws IOException 
{

    String[] theKeywords = { "Monday", "Tuesday", "Wednesday", "Thursday", "Friday", "Saturday", "Sunday"};

    // put each keyword in the map with value 0 
    Map<String, Integer> DayCount = new HashMap<String, Integer>();
    for (String str : theKeywords)
    {
        DayCount.put(str, 0);
    }

    try (BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader("C:\\Eclipse\\test.txt")))
    {

String sCurrentLine;

// read lines until reaching the end of the file
 while ((sCurrentLine = br.readLine()) != null) 
 {


   if (sCurrentLine.length() != 0) 
    {

    // extract the words from the current line in the file
     if (DayCount.containsKey(sCurrentLine))
     {
      DayCount.put(sCurrentLine, DayCount.get(sCurrentLine) + 1);
     }
    }
  }

and heres the output part

 for(String day : theKeywords)
 {
  System.out.println(day + " = " + DayCount.get(day));

 }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to search within the String for actual days of the week. Right now you're asking "does DayCount contain a key by the name of [the entire line]", where what you want is to check each line for all occurrences of each day of the week. A quick and dirty way to do this is to split the string around that word ("Monday", for instance) and count the length of the resulting list:

while ((sCurrentLine = br.readLine()) != null) {
    // For every line in the reader...

    for (String dayOfWeek : (Set<String>) DayCount.keySet()) {
        // For each day of the week (the keys in the DayCount map), count how
        // many times that key shows up in the line.
        int occurrences = sCurrentLine.split(dayOfWeek, -1).length - 1;

        // Now increase the appropriate counter by the number of occurrences (0+)
        DayCount.put(dayOfWeek, (Integer) DayCount.get(dayOfWeek) + occurrences);
    }
}

Since you're having issues with iterating over a Set (which is a mystery, but outside the scope of your original question), you could also write it like this (as I mentioned in the comments--note the change in the inner loop):

while ((sCurrentLine = br.readLine()) != null) {
    // For every line in the reader...

    //NOTE: I strongly advise renaming theKeywords to something more descriptive!
    for (String dayOfWeek : theKeywords) {
        // For each day of the week, count how many times that key shows up.
        int occurrences = sCurrentLine.split(dayOfWeek, -1).length - 1;

        // Now increase the appropriate counter by the number of occurrences (0+)
        DayCount.put(dayOfWeek, (Integer) DayCount.get(dayOfWeek) + occurrences);
    }
}

This is all pretty straightforward; the only weird bit is this:

int occurrences = sCurrentLine.split(dayOfWeek, -1).length - 1;

This code calls the split method on the current line. It passes in the day of the week to split around, and an awkward-looking -1 as the "maxSplits". This negative value tells the split method to include empty strings at the end of the line in the results. Otherwise, whereas the line "a b c Monday " would return an array of length two as expected (["a b c ", " "]), the line "a b c Monday" (no space at the end) would return an array of length one because the last item would be empty.

Once we have the correct array split around our day of the week, we count the number of items in it and subtract one to get the actual number of occurrences. This is always legal, as the minimum size our array will have is 1 (in the case that no splitting happens, so the original String is the only element in the returned array).

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this doesn't seem to be working. this is what I have in the textfile right now and I am getting (Monday = 0, Tuesday = -1, Wednesday = 1) a bc def ghij * Monday Wednesday Monday Tuesday Monday where Monday Wednesday Monday is all on the same line –  user2007843 Mar 6 '13 at 20:50
    
@user2007843 I can't even imagine where the -1 is coming from. When I run it with the file you just described I get Monday = 2, Tuesday = 1, Wednesday = 1, because the split method doesn't pick up the last one if there are no characters after it-- you have to give it another parameter to allow an empty match at the end (fixed in my answer now; working on all cases I can find). –  Henry Keiter Mar 6 '13 at 21:10
    
This line is giving me issues (Set<String>) DayCount.keySet() The error says Can only iterate over an array or an instance of java.lang.iterable –  user2007843 Mar 6 '13 at 21:15
    
@user2007843 Not sure what to tell you about that; Sets are iterables, so... For testing, you can change it to for (String dayOfWeek : theKeywords) since you've still got that array hanging around. That's not very clean, though; I'd at least rename theKeywords to daysOfTheWeek or something if you're going to use it like that. –  Henry Keiter Mar 6 '13 at 21:20
    
I wonder why I would get an error but you dont?? –  user2007843 Mar 6 '13 at 21:28

What is the specification of the DayCount class? Its hard to figure out what the intention of the code is without knowing that.

Anyway, you can figure out if a line contains a day of week using the contains method;

if(sCurrentLine.contains("Monday") || sCurrentLine.contains("Tuesday") || ...) then ...

share|improve this answer
    
i added the beginning of the code to the original question –  user2007843 Mar 6 '13 at 20:19
    
where exactly should I put this in my code? –  user2007843 Mar 6 '13 at 21:08

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