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I need to do this:

if [ $X != "dogs" and "birds" and "dogs" ]
then
    echo "it's is a monkey"
fi

with bash script. How to proceed?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to turn each option into a separate conditional expression, and then join them together with the && (AND) operator.

if [[ $X != dogs && $X != birds && $X != cats ]]; then
  echo "'$X' is not dogs or birds or cats.  It must be monkeys."
fi

You can also do this with single [...], but then you have to use a separate set for each comparison and move the and operator outside them:

if [ "$X" != dogs ] && [ "$X" != birds ] && [ "$X" != cats ]; then
   ...
fi

Note that you don't need double-quotes around single-word strings like dogs, but you do need them around parameter expansions (variables) like $X inside the single-bracket version, because a space in the value of the parameter will cause a syntax error without the quotes.

Also, there's no need to use uppercase variable names like Xin shell scripts; that's best reserved for variables that come in from the environment, like $PATH and $TERM and so on.

The shell operator version of OR is ||, which works the same way.

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Note that you don't have to quote $X in double brackets, as bash does not perform word expansion on parameters in conditional expressions. [[ $X != dogs ]] would work even if X="lassie scooby". –  chepner Mar 6 '13 at 20:37
    
And how can i do this: if [ $X != "dogs" OR "birds" OR "dogs" ] ? Seems || only accept two conditions... –  user2079266 Mar 6 '13 at 20:39
    
@user2079266 - see edit. OR is ||. But the way you phrased it, the condition will always be true - $Xcannot simultaneously be both dogs and birds, so it will always test as either not one or not the other. –  Mark Reed Mar 6 '13 at 20:40
    
@user2079266 - Do you want [[ ! ( $X = dogs || $X = birds || $X = cats ) ]], which is equivalent to the && expression but with DeMorgan's Law applied? –  chepner Mar 6 '13 at 20:46
2  
Within [], you can use -a for && and -o for ||. –  Idelic Mar 6 '13 at 23:20

You can even think different...

if ! [[ $X == dogs || $X == birds || $X == cats ]]; then
    echo "'$X' is not dogs or birds or cats... It could be monkeys."
fi

As thinking:

it's not a dog AND not a cat and not a bird

is not exactly same as thinking

it's not one of .. dog OR cat OR bird.

This make the approach of case more evident; In fine, I think, in this case, the right manner to do this is:

case $X in
    dogs )
        # There may be some part of code
        ;;
    birds )
        # There may be some other part
        ;;
    cats )
        # There is no need to be something at all...
       ;;          
    * )
       echo "'$X' is not dogs or birds or cats... It could be monkeys."
       ;;
esac

Or if really no need to process birds,cats or dogs case:

case $X in
    dogs|birds|cats ) ;;
    * )
       echo "'$X' is not dogs or birds or cats... It could be monkeys."
       ;;
esac
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lol yes it could be monkeys I will up mark you for your cleverness of changing it from if to case :) –  vahid Mar 6 '13 at 21:41

The only way I can think of in Bash to avoid having to put $X multiple times is to use RegEx:

if [[ ! "$X" =~ (dogs|birds|cats) ]]; then
    echo "it's is a monkey"
fi

Similarly, in shorthand:

[[ ! "$X" =~ (dogs|birds|cats) ]] && echo "it's is a monkey"

This is helpful when you have very long variables, and/or very short comparisons.

Remember to escape special characters.

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X=$1;
if [ "$X" != "dogs" -a "$X" != "birds" -a "$X" != "dogs" ]
then
    echo "it's is a monkey"
fi

closest to what you already had

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