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In ASP.NET we are calling defined js-functions with the:

Page.ClientScript.RegisterStartupScript(GetType(), "", "JSFuncNameHere();", true);

I wonder:

  • Why there isn't any method, which has a name like: Page.ClientScript.CallJSScript("someJSFunc");
  • Why does the upper-method require the reflection method GetType() ? Something isn't defined at runtime, is it?
  • Why do I need the 2nd argument key? As I have tested, I can left it empty and the existed JS-function shall be called.
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1 Answer 1

  • Why there isn't any method, which has a name like: Page.ClientScript.CallJSScript("someJSFunc");

Probably because this is more generic solution, since by just adding 2 characters you get the same result and if you need you can add arguments and anything else.

  • Why does the upper-method require the reflection method GetType() ? Something isn't defined at runtime, is it?
  • Why do I need the 2nd argument key? As I have tested, I can left it empty and the existed JS-function shall be called.

For both of these the same reason - the method will detect if you run the same script multiple times and in such case, call it just once. The two arguments are the means how it identifies duplicates - a key is not sufficient since another class in a different library might be using the same key - so you need to pass in the type of your own class to ensure that the script is executed when you want it to.

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It's worth pointing out that the MSDN documentation for RegisterStartupScript - msdn.microsoft.com/en-AU/library/z9h4dk8y.aspx - provides the answers for points 2 and 3 in "Remarks". When trying to determine the purpose of method parameters, MSDN should always be your first stop :) –  Snixtor Mar 6 '13 at 22:04

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