Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can boost::shared_ptr release the stored pointer without deleting it?

I can see no release function exists in the documentation, also in the FAQ is explained why it does not provide release function, something like that the release can not be done on pointers that are not unique. My pointers are unique. How can I release my pointers ? Or which boost smart pointer class to use that will allow me releasing of the pointer ? I hope that you won't say use auto_ptr :)

share|improve this question
1  
Why not auto_ptr? If they're unique, it must mean they never get copied around (as multiple references would then exist, if only temporarily), and then auto_ptr should work just fine. Or, if you don't plan on using the smart pointer-supplied lifetime management anyway, use a raw pointer. –  jalf Nov 5 '09 at 14:48
1  
In addition to reference count semantics, shared_ptr also provides a custom deleter facility that auto_ptr does not. So here's a scenario: you create an object using a custom allocator (i.e. not global new/delete), and you want a smart pointer for exception safety while you configure the object, but you need to return a raw pointer once you're done doing things that might throw. Unfortunately, neither auto_ptr nor any of the boost smart_ptrs seem to support this. –  Trevor Robinson Aug 20 '10 at 20:38
1  
Had this problem with 3rd party interface. Some interfaces return a 'unique' shared_ptr from factories, since there is a case for that being the best way pre-C++11. A throwing shared_ptr -> unique_ptr conversion might be useful, it's a pain when you can't break rules even when you really want to! –  Zero Nov 26 '12 at 1:28
add comment

10 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to use a deleter that you can request not to delete the underlying pointer.

See this answer (which has been marked as a duplicate of this question) for more information.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Don't. Boost's FAQ entry:

Q. Why doesn't shared_ptr provide a release() function?

A. shared_ptr cannot give away ownership unless it's unique() because the other copy will still destroy the object.

Consider:

shared_ptr<int> a(new int);
shared_ptr<int> b(a); // a.use_count() == b.use_count() == 2

int * p = a.release();

// Who owns p now? b will still call delete on it in its destructor.

Furthermore, the pointer returned by release() would be difficult to deallocate reliably, as the source shared_ptr could have been created with a custom deleter.

So, this would be safe in case it's the only shared_ptr instance pointing to your object (when unique() returns true) and the object doesn't require a special deleter. I'd still question your design, if you used such a .release() function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could use fake deleter. Then pointers will not be deleted actually.

struct NullDeleter {template<typename T> void operator()(T*) {} };

// pp of type some_t defined somewhere
boost::shared_ptr<some_t> x(pp, NullDeleter() );
share|improve this answer
1  
lol, interesting snippet –  Dustin Getz Oct 6 '09 at 15:40
5  
It is interesting, but what would be the purpose of using a shared_ptr in the first place? –  UncleBens Oct 6 '09 at 15:48
    
@UncleBens, such deleter has very limited usage. For instance, when you need to call a function and pass to it something like shared_ptr<some_t>( this ). That will be safe only with NullDeleter. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Oct 6 '09 at 16:54
1  
Yup, we used something like this when the interface (which we didn't control) required a shared_ptr and guaranteed that it wouldn't store the pointer past the function call. –  McBeth Nov 5 '09 at 14:43
1  
If you can use a null deleter, you probably have no need for smart_ptr. –  curiousguy Oct 8 '11 at 22:43
show 1 more comment

Kids, don't do this at home:

// set smarty to point to nothing
// returns old(smarty.get())
// caller is responsible for the returned pointer (careful)
template <typename T>
T* release (shared_ptr<T>& smarty) {
    // sanity check:
    assert (smarty.unique());
    // only one owner (please don't play games with weak_ptr in another thread)
    // would want to check the total count (shared+weak) here

    // save the pointer:
    T *raw = &*smarty;
    // at this point smarty owns raw, can't return it

    try {
        // an exception here would be quite unpleasant

        // now smash smarty:
        new (&smarty) shared_ptr<T> ();
        // REALLY: don't do it!
        // the behaviour is not defined!
        // in practice: at least a memory leak!
    } catch (...) {
        // there is no shared_ptr<T> in smarty zombie now
        // can't fix it at this point:
        // the only fix would be to retry, and it would probably throw again
        // sorry, can't do anything
        abort ();
    }
    // smarty is a fresh shared_ptr<T> that doesn't own raw

    // at this point, nobody owns raw, can return it
    return raw;
}

Now, is there a way to check if total count of owners for the ref count is > 1?

share|improve this answer
    
smarty.use_count() > 1? –  Xeo Oct 8 '11 at 22:45
    
@Xeo No. See boost: use_count "Returns: the number of shared_ptr objects, *this included, that share ownership with *this," or Visual Studio 2010: use_count "_returns the number of shared_ptr objects that own the resource that is owned by *this. And unique() tests exactly that‌​: "use_count() == 1" This is not what is needed here. Yet another problem with shared_ptr. –  curiousguy Oct 8 '11 at 23:03
    
Well, what else do you want from your last question? –  Xeo Oct 8 '11 at 23:04
    
@Xeo As I wrote: "would want to check the total count (shared+weak) here". use_count and unique only consider shared_ptr. I need all shared owners of the internal shared_ptr data structure, and that includes the number of weak_ptr as well. I just need in Boost: pn.pi_->use_count_ + pn.pi_->weak_count_ - 1 (no need to be atomic). –  curiousguy Oct 8 '11 at 23:29
1  
+1 for providing an answer to the question, pity there isn't a nicer way. –  Zero Nov 26 '12 at 1:29
show 4 more comments

To let the pointer point to nothing again, you can call shared_ptr::reset().

However, this will delete the object pointed to when your pointer is the last reference to the object. This, however, is exactly the desired behaviour of the smart pointer in the first place.

If you just want a reference that does not hold the object alive, you can create a boost::weak_ptr (see boost documentation). A weak_ptr holds a reference to the object but does not add to the reference count, so the object gets deleted when only weak references exist.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Forgive them for they know not what they do. This example works with boost::shared_ptr and msvs std::shared_ptr without memory leaks!

template <template <typename> class TSharedPtr, typename Type>
Type * release_shared(TSharedPtr<Type> & ptr)
{
    //! this struct mimics the data of std:shared_ptr ( or boost::shared_ptr )
    struct SharedVoidPtr
    {
        struct RefCounter
        {
            long _Uses;
            long _Weaks;
        };

        void * ptr;
        RefCounter * refC;

        SharedVoidPtr()
        {
            ptr = refC = nullptr;
        }

        ~SharedVoidPtr()
        {
            delete refC;
        }
    };

    assert( ptr.unique() );

    Type * t = ptr.get();

    SharedVoidPtr sp; // create dummy shared_ptr
    TSharedPtr<Type> * spPtr = (TSharedPtr<Type>*)( &sp );
    spPtr->swap(ptr); // swap the contents

    ptr.reset();
    // now the xxx::shared_ptr is empy and
    // SharedVoidPtr releases the raw poiter but deletes the underlying counter data
    return t;
}
share|improve this answer
    
what do they not know? –  dove Dec 4 '12 at 11:42
add comment

You can delete the shared pointer, which seems much the same to me. If pointers are always unique, then std::auto_ptr<> is a good choice. Bear in mind that unique pointers can't be used in STL containers, since operations on them do a lot of copying and temporary duplication.

share|improve this answer
    
Deleting the shared_ptr won't release the pointer. –  curiousguy Oct 8 '11 at 13:41
    
@curiousguy: In which case I'm a little fuzzy on the semantics of "release", not to mention way fuzzy on what the OP really wants to do. –  David Thornley Oct 8 '11 at 20:49
    
Simple: he has converted a pointer to a share_ptr (constructed a share_ptr with some argument p), he wants to do the reverse operation (revert the construction of share_ptr). –  curiousguy Oct 8 '11 at 22:08
add comment

Here's a hack that might work. I wouldn't recommend it unless you're in a real bind.

template<typename T>
T * release_shared(std::shared_ptr<T> & shared)
{
    static std::vector<std::shared_ptr<T> > graveyard;
    graveyard.push_back(shared);
    shared.reset();
    return graveyard.back().get();
}
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't provide release semantic. –  curiousguy Oct 8 '11 at 13:38
    
@curiousguy, I'm not sure what you mean. Here's the definition of auto_ptr::release from cplusplus.com: "Sets the auto_ptr internal pointer to null pointer (which indicates it points to no object) without destructing the object currently pointed by the auto_ptr". This function does that; the reset sets the pointer to null, and copying the pointer to a static graveyard object prevents shared_ptr from deleting it. –  Mark Ransom Oct 9 '11 at 1:51
    
"This function does that" but not only that. The contract of release is to do only what is specified. "copying the pointer to a static graveyard" is not part of release specification. –  curiousguy Oct 9 '11 at 2:07
    
@curiousguy, there's no documented way to prevent a shared_ptr from deleting the object it's pointing to. My "hack" as I fully admitted is to leave a smart_ptr reference hanging around without ever being destroyed. This is an implementation detail that is not visible outside of the release_shared function. –  Mark Ransom Oct 9 '11 at 2:24
    
"to leave a smart_ptr reference hanging around without ever being destroyed" I didn't knew that static variables are never destroyed. –  curiousguy Oct 9 '11 at 2:51
add comment

The basis of sharing is trust. If some instance in your program needs to release the raw pointer, it is almost for sure that shared_ptr is the wrong type.

However, recently I wanted to do this too, as I needed to deallocate from a different process-heap. In the end I was taught that my older decision to use some std::shared_ptr was not thought-out.

I just routinely used this type for cleanup. But the pointer was just duplicated on a few places. Actually I needed a std::unique_ptr, which (suprise) has a release function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

If your pointers are indeed unique do use std::unique_ptr or boost::scoped_ptr if the former is not available for your compiler. Otherwise consider combining the use of boost::shared_ptr with boost::weak_ptr. Check out the Boost documentation for details.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.