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I am trying to compile the code below.

file Class12.h

template <class T1>
class class1
{
public:
typedef T1 Type1;
void class1Method();
};

template <class T1>
void class1<T1>::class1Method()
{
}


template <class T1, class T2>
class class2
{
public:
typedef T2 Type2;
void class2Method();
};

template <class T1, class T2>
void class2<T1,T2>::class2Method()
{
  typedef typename::class2<typename class1<T1>::Type1, T2> Type3;
}

file class.h

#include "class12.h"

template<>
class class2<int,double>
{
};

However I get the following errors:

g++ -g -c class.h -o class.o
In file included from class.h:1:
class12.h: In member function `void class2<T1, T2>::class2Method()':
class12.h:27: error: expected nested-name-specifier
class12.h:27: error: expected init-declarator before "Type3"
class12.h:27: error: expected `,' or `;' before "Type3"
make: *** [class.o] Error 1

Can somebody help me please?

Thanks you very much for your time in advance. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Argh, tab abuse... can you please edit your post? –  Kerrek SB Mar 6 '13 at 21:25
    
@Kerrek SB What do you mean? Is it ok now? :) –  geraldCelente Mar 6 '13 at 23:36
    
To format your code you must use either spaces or tabs, but not both. If you mix, the indentation doesn't come out the way you want. It's still broken. –  Kerrek SB Mar 7 '13 at 8:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well, the compiler is pretty explicit: class1 is a class template, so it needs template parameters. You don't have any here:

typedef typename class2<typename class1::Type1> Type3;
          //                           ^ here!

You need something of the form

typedef class2<typename class1<T>::Type1> Type3;

where T is probably T2. Note there is no need for the first typename.

As in your previous question, the typedefs should be public.

share|improve this answer
    
following your suggestions and Andy's I have updated the coda accordingly. That did help, however, now I get errors g++ -g -c class12.h -o class12.o class12.h: In member function void class2<T1, T2>::class2Method()': class12.h:25: error: expected nested-name-specifier class12.h:25: error: expected init-declarator before "Type3" class12.h:25: error: expected ,' or `;' before "Type3" make: *** [class12.o] Error 1 –  geraldCelente Mar 6 '13 at 22:22
    
@geraldCelente have you made the typedefs public like I suggested? Also, it looks like you are trying to compile the template code into an object file. You can't do that. You need to include it in code that instantiates it with specific types, then compile that code. –  juanchopanza Mar 6 '13 at 22:27
    
Hello, there. Thank you very much to both for your time and patience :). I have updated the code accoding to your suggestions and Andy's. However I keep getting the same error. Honestly i don't think the problem is related to the Access level as in my code, on which the example is based the types are all public. –  geraldCelente Mar 6 '13 at 23:50
    
Nor I think it is related to the fact that I am compiling it into an object file. I know I can compile a templated class and use it as a library; however a templated class does compile into an object class. I always do that to ensure that my code is syntactically correct before instatitating templated classes into other classes and making them part of my project. –  geraldCelente Mar 6 '13 at 23:51
    
@Bo Persson Thank you! That was the fix. Thanks. I had to replace typedef typename::class2<typename class1<T1>::Type1, T2> Type3; with typedef class2<typename class1<T1>::Type1, T2> Type3; –  geraldCelente Mar 7 '13 at 11:35

In this line:

typedef typename class2<typename class1::Type1> Type3;

You do not provide any template argument for the class1<> class template. Moreover, you do not need the typename keyword unless you have a qualified, dependent name. Whether or not you do have one depends on how you want to instantiate class1<>.

Moreover, if you want to have class1Method() and class2Method() as member functions of class1 and class2 respectively, you should use this syntax:

template <class T1>
class class1
{
    typedef T1 Type1;
    void class1Method();
};

template <class T2>
void class1<T2>::class1Method()
//   ^^^^^^^^^^^^
{
}

UPDATE:

After editing, the code in your question has one further problem: the name class2 inside the class2Method() member function refers to the class that function is a member of, which is an instantiation of class2. To refer to the class2 class template, you can qualify the name with the namespace it belongs to (in this case, the global namespace):

typedef typename ::class2<typename class1<T1>::Type1, T2> Type3;
//               ^^

Also, do not forget to give the correct access level to members of your classes, or you won't be able to access them from outside their member functions: for classes, the default is private. I think you should use public in this case. For instance:

template <class T1>
class class1
{
public: // <== MAKE THE MEMBERS AND TYPE DEFINITIONS ACCESSIBLE TO 
        //     FUNCTIONS WHICH ARE NOT MEMBER FUNCTIONS OF THIS CLASS
    typedef T1 Type1;
    void class1Method();
};
share|improve this answer
    
following your suggestions and juanchopanza's I have updated the coda accordingly. That did help, however, now I get errors g++ -g -c class12.h -o class12.o class12.h: In member function void class2<T1, T2>::class2Method()': class12.h:25: error: expected nested-name-specifier class12.h:25: error: expected init-declarator before "Type3" class12.h:25: error: expected ,' or `;' before "Type3" make: *** [class12.o] Error 1 –  geraldCelente Mar 6 '13 at 22:25
    
@geraldCelente: See the update to my answer –  Andy Prowl Mar 6 '13 at 22:31
    
Hello, there. Thank you very much for your time and patience :). I have updated the code accoding to your suggestions and juanchopanza's. However I keep getting the same error. Honestly i don't think the problem is related to the Access level as in my code, on which the example is based the types are all public. –  geraldCelente Mar 6 '13 at 23:42
    
@geraldCelente: So have you also used ::class2 instead of class2? Maybe you should post your real code, otherwise we will be solving problems you don't have and not solving those you have –  Andy Prowl Mar 6 '13 at 23:47
    
It was not working as I had typedef typename::class2<typename class1<T1>::Type1, T2> Type3; whereas I needed to have typedef class2<typename class1<T1>::Type1, T2> Type3; Thanks you both for your support. Without your help, I would have not fixed it! –  geraldCelente Mar 7 '13 at 11:30

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