Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a button in my form (not the submit) which triggers an AJAX call. I want the page to reload afterwards and reflect the new state (modified by the AJAX call). The AJAX call works fine, UNLESS I try to add a redirect at the end of the success: callback function. When the redirect is working in the callback, the page redirects and the AJAX call has had no effect.

It seems like the redirect is "interrupting" the AJAX call and not letting it happen, but that confuses me. I thought the success: callback only happend after the call is made. So how could things in that callback function interfere with things that should have already occurred?

Here's some HTML:

    <a href="http://example.dev/my-file-delete" id="deleteresume">Delete file</a>           

Here's my javascript:

    var deleteresume = function(event) {
        event.preventDefault();
        $.ajax({
            type: "POST",
            url: "<?php echo $link_to_delete; ?>",
            success: hideresumefile( event.target )
        });

    }
    $("#deleteresume").click( deleteresume );
    var hideresumefile = function( target ) {
        $(target).closest('div').css('display', 'none');
        //THIS IS THE PROBLEM...
        $(location).attr('href', 'http://example.dev/handler.php');
    }

I've tried numerous variations of the redirect, for example:

window.location.replace("url");
window.location.href = "url";
location.reload(true);
window.location.reload(true);
location.href('url');
window.location.href('url');

When these work the AJAX call doesn't. What am I missing?

share|improve this question
2  
Redirecting the user to another page on an ajax callback function defeats the purpose of using ajax to begin with. –  Brad M Mar 6 '13 at 21:44
    
That depends on the purpose of why AJAX is being used. My reason for doing so is irrelevant to this question, but it's not about avoiding a page reload. –  SDP Mar 6 '13 at 21:46
add comment

2 Answers 2

Wrap your hideresumefile call within a function.

var deleteresume = function(event) {
    event.preventDefault();
    $.ajax({
        type: "POST",
        url: "<?php echo $link_to_delete; ?>",
        success: function(result) { hideresumefile( event.target ); }
    });
}

$("#deleteresume").click( deleteresume );

var hideresumefile = function( target ) {
    $(target).closest('div').css('display', 'none');
    $(location).attr('href', 'http://example.dev/handler.php');
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, great idea :). –  kapa Mar 6 '13 at 22:19
add comment
success: hideresumefile( event.target )

You are not passing the function, you are calling it here. This means that your hideresumefile function will actually run before the AJAX call...

success must be a function, to keep the same functionality, you could use:

success: function () {
    hideresumefile( event.target );
}

So you wrap the function call in another function, which is only defined, not invoked. It will only be invoked when the AJAX action is successful.

share|improve this answer
    
That explains it. Thanks! –  SDP Mar 6 '13 at 21:52
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.