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Suppose you have a reoccurence defined by: T(n) = T(n/2) +1. How does one evaluate this without master's method? What I have so far:

T(n) = T(n/2) + 1 T(n/2) = T(n/4) + 1 T(n/4) = T(n/8) + 1 ... T(1) = 1

It looks like this would be O(logn). Is this the only way to do these problems where master s theorem does not occur?

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1 Answer 1

How you got this T(1) = 1?
Lets see:
T(0) = T(0/2) + 1 => 0 = 1!
So the T(x) function have an asymptote at x=0.
Please notice that we can redefine it to:
T(2^(x+1)) = T(2^x) + 1
=>
f(x+1) = f(x) + 1
=>
f(x) = x + a
=>
T(n) = Log2(n) + a(n)
where a(n) is a function with interval lenght 1

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