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I have a data frame with 4 columns. Column 1 consists of ID's, column 2 consists of texts (about 100 words each), column 3 and 4 consist labels.

Now I would like to retrieve word frequencies (of the most common words) from the texts column and add those frequencies as extra columns to the data frame. I would like the column names to be the words themselves and the columns filled with their frequencies (ranging from 0 to ... per text) in the texts.

I tried some funcions of the tm package but until now unsatisfactory. Does anyone has any idea how to deal with this problem or where to start? Is there a package that can do the job?

id texts label1 label2

Many thanks in advance!

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Try install.packages("sos"); library("sos"); findFn("word frequency") and you'll see quite a few options to dig through. I don't know this field but a quick look suggests the capability probably already exists. –  Bryan Hanson Mar 6 '13 at 22:06
    
Thanks Bryan! I will have a look. –  user1983395 Mar 6 '13 at 22:07
    
Unfortenately I am not quite sure sos will help me dealing with my problem. –  user1983395 Mar 6 '13 at 22:19
    
I found 185 matches - none of them look promising? Or is it more about integrating what you have already done with one of the existing functions? You might need to loop over your existing data frame and accumulate your answer in some structure, but that's a slightly different question than you originally asked. If that's the case, post a small sample of your data so we can figure out a solution. –  Bryan Hanson Mar 6 '13 at 22:21
1  
@user1983395 paste the head rows of the data or a dput(head(YOUTDATA)) and then highlight and click the curly braces looking icon. Also what do you mean by ``of the most common words''? Give a specific number (i.e. top 10). Also do you mean of the most common words- used by all rows? –  Tyler Rinker Mar 6 '13 at 22:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well let's work through the issues then...

I'm guessing you have a data.frame that looks like this:

       person sex adult                                 state code
1         sam   m     0         Computer is fun. Not too fun.   K1
2        greg   m     0               No it's not, it's dumb.   K2
3     teacher   m     1                    What should we do?   K3
4         sam   m     0                  You liar, it stinks!   K4
5        greg   m     0               I am telling the truth!   K5
6       sally   f     0                How can we be certain?   K6
7        greg   m     0                      There is no way.   K7
8         sam   m     0                       I distrust you.   K8
9       sally   f     0           What are you talking about?   K9
10 researcher   f     1         Shall we move on?  Good then.  K10
11       greg   m     0 I'm hungry.  Let's eat.  You already?  K11

This data set comes from the qdap package. to get qdap use install.packages("qdap").

Now to make the reproducible example I was talking about with your data set do what I'm doing here with the DATA data set from qdap.

DATA
dput(head(DATA))

Ok now for your original problem I think wfm will do what you want:

freqs <- t(wfm(DATA$state, 1:nrow(DATA)))
data.frame(DATA, freqs, check.names = FALSE)

If you only wanted the top so many words use an ordering technique like I use here:

freqs <- t(wfm(DATA$state, 1:nrow(DATA)))
ords <- rev(sort(colSums(freqs)))[1:9]      #top 9 words
top9 <- freqs[, names(ords)]                #grab those columns from freqs  
data.frame(DATA, top9, check.names = FALSE) #put it together

The outcome looks like this:

> data.frame(DATA, top9, check.names = FALSE)
       person sex adult                                 state code you we what not no it's is i fun
1         sam   m     0         Computer is fun. Not too fun.   K1   0  0    0   1  0    0  1 0   2
2        greg   m     0               No it's not, it's dumb.   K2   0  0    0   1  1    2  0 0   0
3     teacher   m     1                    What should we do?   K3   0  1    1   0  0    0  0 0   0
4         sam   m     0                  You liar, it stinks!   K4   1  0    0   0  0    0  0 0   0
5        greg   m     0               I am telling the truth!   K5   0  0    0   0  0    0  0 1   0
6       sally   f     0                How can we be certain?   K6   0  1    0   0  0    0  0 0   0
7        greg   m     0                      There is no way.   K7   0  0    0   0  1    0  1 0   0
8         sam   m     0                       I distrust you.   K8   1  0    0   0  0    0  0 1   0
9       sally   f     0           What are you talking about?   K9   1  0    1   0  0    0  0 0   0
10 researcher   f     1         Shall we move on?  Good then.  K10   0  1    0   0  0    0  0 0   0
11       greg   m     0 I'm hungry.  Let's eat.  You already?  K11   1  0    0   0  0    0  0 0   0
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Hi Tyler, this is EXACTLY what I was looking for. Thank you so much! –  user1983395 Mar 7 '13 at 8:40
    
Hi Tyler, I have an additional question. Perhaps you can give me a clue about how to deal with that. Would qdap being able to help me make variables that represent bigrams (and their frequencies as data) instead of just only the frequencies of single words? –  user1983395 May 18 '13 at 12:57
    
Yes but ask as a separate question please. –  Tyler Rinker May 18 '13 at 13:47
    
done: stackoverflow.com/questions/16626168/… –  user1983395 May 18 '13 at 15:55

I would suggest looking at the tm package and using that to construct a Term Documentation Matrix for evaluating word frequencies. they have a great tutorial which will help this and other tasks such as cleaning and stemming the text corpus.

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