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Say I have a library with an abstract class which has an abstract method:

public abstract class MyAbstractClass{

    public void myMethod(){
        int a = doSomething("hi");
    }

    public abstract void doSomething(String param);
}

Now I've decided to add a parameter to the method, but I want to keep the functionality of the old method to keep old code usable:

public void myMethod(){
    int a = ?
}

/**
 * @deprecated use doSomething(String, String) instead.
 */
@Deprecated
public int doSomething(String param){ return doSomething(param, null); }

public abstract int doSomething(String param, String secondParam);

How would I implement my myMethod in this scenario?


The PagerAdapter class in the Android support library has in fact some kind of construction like this, but the other way around:

public Object instantiateItem(ViewGroup container, int position) {
    return instantiateItem((View) container, position);
}

/**
 * @deprecated Use {@link #instantiateItem(ViewGroup, int)}
 */
public Object instantiateItem(View container, int position) {
    throw new UnsupportedOperationException(
            "Required method instantiateItem was not overridden");
}

Should this behavior be discouraged? And if I were to use this construction, how would I know what method to call?

share|improve this question
4  
How could the old code be usable? You introduced a new abstract method, breaking all the existing subclasses. –  JB Nizet Mar 6 '13 at 22:52
4  
Why can't you keep calling doSomething("hi") (with a suppression warning) or just call doSomething("hi", null)? –  Jon Skeet Mar 6 '13 at 22:53
    
You can call the new doSomething(String, String) in myMethod(). –  shuangwhywhy Mar 6 '13 at 22:54
    
@JBNizet Hmm, true. So the best way is to remove the abstract keyword and throw some error saying that the method needs to be overridden? –  Niek Haarman Mar 6 '13 at 22:55
    
@JonSkeet I want to add some extra data for the implementer to (optionally) use to calculate the result. –  Niek Haarman Mar 6 '13 at 22:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think I see your predicament. You have an abstract class in a library that people are subclassing and implementing it's abstract method and you want deprecate this method and add a new abstract method that moving forward should be implemented instead.

Here's what I would do:

Before

Starting with a Feature class that users of your library are subclassing

public abstract class Feature {
    public abstract void doSomething(String param);
}

After

Keep the Feature class pretty much as it is, however deprecate the method and advertise in your documentation that people should now subclass NewFeature instead of Feature and implement the shiny new abstract method in that class. Existing code that subclasses Feature should still work.

public abstract class Feature {
    /**
      @deprecated Extend NewFeature instead and implement doSomething(a, b) 
    */
    @Deprecated
    public abstract void doSomething(String param);
}

public abstract class NewFeature extends Feature {

    @Deprecated
    @Override
    public void doSomething(String param) {
        doSomething(param, null);
    }

    public abstract void doSomething(String param, String paramTwo);
}

Further in the future

Once enough time has passed you could remove the Feature class. For example, I think spring tend to remove methods one whole version after they were first advertised as deprecated.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks indeed as the ideal way to go. I could check if the class is a subclass of NewFeature to decide what method to call. As a matter of fact, I wouldn't need to call doSomething(param, null) in the doSomething() method of NewFeature as it will never be called anyway? –  Niek Haarman Mar 6 '13 at 23:30
    
Yeah sure - whatever makes sense really. It's hard to say without a concrete example. –  theon Mar 6 '13 at 23:37

Based on the comments, here's what I would do instead:

public void myMethod(){
    int a = doSomething("hi", "theOptimalSecondArgumentValue");
}

/**
 * @deprecated use doSomething(String, String) instead.
 */
@Deprecated
public abstract int doSomething(String param);

/**
 * Delegates to {@link #doSomething(String)} and thus ignores the second argument 
 * by default. Subclasses should override this method to return a better result,
 * taking the second argument into account
 */
public int doSomething(String param, String secondParam) {
    return doSomething(param);
}

Existing subclasses would still work, but would be in a "degraded" mode, where the second argument is always ignored.

New subclasses would simply be implemented the following way:

@Override
public int doSomething(String param) {
    doSomething(param, "theOptimalDefaultValue");
}

@Override
public int doSomething(String param, String secondParam) {
    // compute the result using the two arguments
}
share|improve this answer
    
Although this would work, I think it adds some confusion to the implementer. Deprecating the method, but still requiring it to be overridden. –  Niek Haarman Mar 6 '13 at 23:31

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