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I'm using Ghostscript to convert searchable PDFs to image PDFs so that they can be viewed using an imaging toolkit using a command line like this:

gswin32 -o c:\temp\output%d.png -r300 -dTextAlphaBits=4 -dGraphicsAlphaBits=4 -dDOINTERPOLATE -dSAFER -sDEVICE=png16m c:\temp\test.pdf

If I add the -dDOPDFMARKS command line parameter it renders the annotation mark showing that there's an annotation but not the annotation text.

Does anyone know how to get Ghostscript to render annotation text? I've googled the life out of it without any luck.

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2 Answers 2

Without seeing your PDF file I can't be sure but there are several possible reasons. Your annotation may be closed, ie not displaying anything when you open the PDF file. It may not have an appearance stream, Ghostscript does not manufacture appearance streams for all annotation types.

Update

What the provided PDF sample contains is 2 annotations: the first is the 'popup' annotation; the second is a text annotation.

Popup annotations are basically interactive, because you can open and close them, move them around etc. However, Ghostscript doesn't support interactive elements. So what you get is the icon for the popup but you don't get the associated text annotation.

There is no way currently to render this text with Ghostscript.

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When I open it in Adobe Reader it shows the annotation text. I don't know how to check for an appearance stream. –  ghosttie Mar 7 '13 at 14:37
    
Can you share the (or a) PDF ? –  KenS Mar 7 '13 at 16:31
    
Here you go –  ghosttie Mar 7 '13 at 19:40
    
OK what you actually have here is 2 annotations, the first is the 'popup' annotation and the second is a text annotation. Popup annotations are basically interactive, because you can open and close them, move them around etc, and Ghostscript doesn't support interactive elements. So you get the icon for the popup but you don't get the associated text annotation. There is no way currently to render this text with Ghostscript. –  KenS Mar 8 '13 at 8:22
    
Thanks. If you update your answer to say this I'll mark it as answering the question. –  ghosttie Mar 8 '13 at 14:41

It's possible, but it would be hacky.

Ghostscript is an open source postscript interpreter. PDF's are just postscript files which use a special pre-defined dictionary. In ghostscript 8.62 or prior, the dictionaries are located as postscript text files in the directory /lib. Inside of /lib is a file pdf_draw.ps, which is used to render the PDF into what you see in the .png file. Inside pdf_draw.ps is a definition for /drawidget, which draws the little symbol you see which represents the annotation. At his place in the code, the entire annotation is available, it is just not being used.

A simple demonstration is to add the 2 lines shown below (just after the /drawwidget { %...), directly below the /drawwidget line and run gswin32 in a console with gswin32c. This will result in 2 lines being displayed as the PDF is rendered in the console window.

/drawwidget { % <scalefactor> <annot> drawwidget -
    dup   /Contents known {dup /Contents get  == } if 
    dup   /T known { dup /T get  == } if 

Output

(This is a test sticky note)
(Laurie Shufeldt)

Where it gets tricky is defining what to do with the annotations, which is why they are not being displayed.

In this case, one method might be to place a footnote reference on top of the widget and placing a footnote at the bottom of the page with the text formatted which makes sense to the intent of the sticky.

Alternatively the stickies could be images in place, similar to how they look when expanded in acrobat, but this would cover the content below the sticky.

How hacky the implementation would be would depend on how much effort is put into the implementation. editing pdf_draw.ps is very hacky, but quick and easy. It should be possible to put the hacks into their own file and call them as part of the command line. If putting the change into a header works, "it should" work in the current version of ghostscript, not just the old one.

Pre-defining the number of allowable stickies and a fixed location of the footnotes would ease the placing of footnotes. If stickies have extra long text, the text would need to have special formatting to allow line breaks, where short text which assumed no line breaks would be easier to program.

Perhaps you just want to extract the data from the stickies and put them in the database. If that's the case, the above code is close to what you need.

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