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What I want to write is something like

void foo()
{
    int a = 5;
    ExecuteOnUnwind eou(bind(&cleanupFunc, a));
}

Such that cleanupFunc(a) is called when the function returns or an exception is thrown. Is there some facility already available that will do this for me? I wasn't able to find the right phrase to google, but it seems like there is probably something out there that does this. If not, I quickly put together a solution below. Oddly enough it doesn't seem to work in release mode, but does work in debug on vc10 - how can i tweak the implementation to make it work consistently on both without risking additional calls to temporaries?

Edit: fix involves using shared_ptr; also alleviates any concerns about temporary destruction. new code is below

template <typename T>
struct ExecuteOnUnwindHelper
{   
    ExecuteOnUnwindHelper(const T & _functor) : mFunctor(_functor)
    {
    }

    ~ExecuteOnUnwindHelper()
    {
        mFunctor();
    }

    const T & mFunctor;
};

template <typename T>
boost::shared_ptr<ExecuteOnUnwindHelper<T>> ExecuteOnUnwind(const T & _functor)
{
    return boost::shared_ptr<ExecuteOnUnwindHelper<T>>(new ExecuteOnUnwindHelper<T>(_functor));
}

void cleanupFunc(int a)
{
    wcout << L"cleanup" << endl;
}

void foo()
{
    int a = 5;
    auto eou = ExecuteOnUnwind(boost::bind(&cleanupFunc, 5));
}

int main()
{
    foo();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Probably, you should get a grip on RAII and rewrite your code, so you wouldn't notice need for cleanup functions on exceptions throws. –  hate-engine Mar 6 '13 at 23:54
    
The need in this case isn't a cleanup function, it's a notification to another process that foo has completed; the above is just an illustration. –  Rollie Mar 6 '13 at 23:55
2  
do you have the same release mode problem if you explicitly allocate and deallocate the object on the heap? In this case, you could use a boost::smart_ptr to fake this. It looks like a compiler bug to me, but it would be weird on such a basic feature. What compiler are you using? –  Mic Mar 7 '13 at 0:05
    
I agree with @Mic; if what you're saying is true, then this sounds like a compiler bug. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 7 '13 at 0:08
    
@Mic VC10; the error does not occur on g++4.7, don't know about vc11 (would be curious if anyone has it laying around). Either way, the change to shared_ptr fixed the issue, and is a good idea - make it an answer so I can accept? (changing my code to reflect changes) –  Rollie Mar 7 '13 at 0:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The compiler must somehow optimize away the creation of the variable on the stack because it thinks it's not used. Maybe it just inlines the call to the function and skips the creation / destruction part (I would say it is the most likely). It thinks the global semantics is preserved, but it's actually not a safe optimization as your example shows.

I think it is a wrong optimization because it obviously changes the high-level semantics.It would be interesting to test with various compilers. I will try with VS2012 when I get a chance at home.

Anyway, to force it to go through a creation / destruction sequence, just use a boost::shared_ptr and it will take care of creating the object and destructing it when the object goes out of scope, be it through a return statement or through an exception throw.

share|improve this answer
    
As an interesting aside, i made some modifications and managed to get visual studio 2010 to consistently crash: tny.cz/42dcb25f. If you take out the 4th 'ExecuteOnUnwind' though, it compiles fine - very strange! –  Rollie Mar 7 '13 at 1:01
    
You mean the compiler crashes? –  Mic Mar 7 '13 at 3:30
    
Ah yeah, compiler. –  Rollie Mar 7 '13 at 4:09
    
ah nasty then. Then it means it's definitely something the compiler doesn't make sense about. Then it's not surprising it's doing weird stuff. I'll try on VS2012 and tell you what happens. –  Mic Mar 7 '13 at 4:10

The simplest solution would be to put the required functionality into the destructor of a type. There shouldn't be a need for auto/smart pointers in your case and the stack would been sufficient and may remove the compiler issue you may be experiencing.

class ExecuteOnUnwind
{
public:
~ExecuteOnUnwind()
{
/** Do something */
}

int data;

};

void foo()
{
  ExecuteOnUnwind runOnExit;

/** Functions code here */
runOnExit.data = 5;

}

If this didn't/doesn't work then you could disable the optimisation around the affected code (i.e. destructor).:

#pragma optimize( "", off )
...
#pragma optimize( "", on )
share|improve this answer
    
that's what op did and it doesn't work since release mode optimizes away the creation/destruction of the variable. Most likely through inlining. See my answer. –  Mic Mar 7 '13 at 0:44

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