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So Inversion Of Control is a vague description, so Dependency Injection became the new definition. This is a very, very powerful solution and is quite possibly just as confusing to someone whom has never encountered it.

So in my quest to not be a deer in headlights, I read up. I found several terrific books and online post. But like all wonderful things, more questions arose rather then answers.

The problem, absorbing variables from an unknown project to be implemented once they've been introduced into my project.

The solution:

public interface ISiteParameter
{
    Guid CustomerId { get; set; }
    string FirstName { get; set; }
    string LastName { get; set; }
    string Phone { get; set; }
}

My injector:

public interface IInjectSiteParameter
{
     void InjectSite(ISiteParameter dependant);
}

Then I created this:

public class SiteContent : IInjectSiteParameter
{
    private ISiteParameter _dependent;

    #region Interface Member:
    public void InjectSite(ISiteParameter dependant)
    {
        _dependant = dependant;
    }
    #endregion
}

Then to implement it with a Shared Reference to be Fed Variables I created a class to be implemented like:

public class SiteParameters : ISiteParameter
{    
   public Guid Customer Id { get; set; }
   public string FirstName { get; set; }
   public string LastName  { get; set; }
   public string Phone { get; set; }
}

Now the SiteParameters Class will be referenced by the other project; which will allow me to actually call these properties whenever and wherever with:

ISiteParameter i = new ISiteParameter();
MessageBox.Show(i.Guid + i.FirstName + i.LastName + i.Phone);

That was the implementation, but my question is this... When do I do I use?

  • Constructor Injection
  • Setter Injection
  • Interface Injection

When would you use one or the other? And for the task I mentioned should of I implemented such a difficult task to adjust for any changes made to the other project?

Did I fall off the curve in my thought process?

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I commend your foray into DI, indeed it is powerful. As you've got it setup there isn't yet much benefit over simply passing specific values via signature to your method. The real power will arise when your ISiteParameter instance holds defined methods specific to its behavior, apart from other ISiteParameter instances. –  KodeKreachor Mar 7 '13 at 0:24
    
@KodeKreachor I was pondering on how to implement some of those benefits. But I'm a DI / IoC virgin. –  Greg Mar 7 '13 at 0:25
    
Gotta point out you're attempting to instantiate an interface.. –  Simon Whitehead Mar 7 '13 at 2:55
    
@SimonWhitehead Yeah, I just caught that lovely typo. That is a fail on my part. –  Greg Mar 7 '13 at 23:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Pulled from chapter 4 of Dependency Injection in .NET by Mark Seemann

Constructor injection should be your default choice for DI. It addresses the most common scenario where a class requires one or more dependencies. If the depending class absolutely can’t function without the dependency that guarantee is valuable.

Property injection should only be used when the class you’re developing has a good local default and you still want to enable callers to provide different implementations of the class’s dependency. Property injection may also be used in cases where frameworks require you to have default constructors, like ASP.NET pages.

Method injection is best used when the dependency can vary with each method call. This can be the case when the dependency itself represents a value, but is often seen when the caller wishes to provide the consumer with information about the context in which the operation is being invoked.

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I shall delve further down the rabbit hole with that reading. –  Greg Mar 7 '13 at 0:33

Wherever possible, I use Constructors to pass depdendencies, instead of injecting via a method call.

For example:

public interface IWebHost 
{ 
   string DoSomething(string input); 
} 

public class FooManager 
{
   private IWebHost _host; 
   public FooManager(IWebHost host)
   {  
      _host = host; 
   } 

   public void Process()
   { 
      // do something with _host 
   }
} 

There are a number of benefits to this, but the two I find most beneficial:

  • My dependencies are specified up-front, there's less chance of one being missed.
  • I can use a Dependency Injection repository to do the construction for me, automatically.

There are scenarios where it's impossible or impractical to do this, but most of them can be worked around by injecting a Factory which does the construction for me.

Another example:

public interface IConnection : IDisposable 
{
   string DoSomething(string input); 
   // implement IDisposable
}

public interface IConnectionFactory 
{
   IConnection CreateConnection(); 
} 

public class DerpConnection : IConnection 
{
    // implementation
} 

public class DerpConnectionFactory : IConnectionFactory 
{
  // We only return DerpConnections from this factory.  

  IConnection CreateConnection() { return new DerpConnection(); } 
}

public class BarManager 
{ 
   private IConnectionFactory _connectionFactory; 
   public BarManager(IConnectionFactory connectionFactory)
   {   
      _connectionFactory = connectionFactory;
   } 

   public void Manage()
   {
      using(var connection = _connectionFactory.CreateConnection()) 
      { 
        // do something here. 
      } 
   }
}

The DI framework only needs to know about the IConnectionFactory in this example, and the Factory implementation directly constructs the DerpConnection. In unit testing, I can mock the factory and the IConnection response easily.

Scenarios where this isn't possible, usually indicate some kind of cross-cutting concern, or the class is a lot more complex than it needs to be (and is violating SRP)

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Thank you Will, I shall review this. –  Greg Mar 7 '13 at 0:42

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