Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm having a lot of trouble figuring out how to properly build my ForeignKey column for a table I'm defining. I've outlined my models here (and put a comment next to the problematic line in my PhoneNumber model):

class AreaCode(db.Model):
    __tablename__ = 'areacodes'
    area_code = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    exchanges = db.relationship('Exchanges', backref='area_code')


class Exchange(db.Model):
    __tablename__ = 'exchanges'
    exchange = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    area_code_pk = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('areacodes.area_code'), primary_key=True)


class PhoneNumber(db.Model):
    __tablename__ = 'phonenumbers'
    phone_number = db.Column(db.Numeric(precision=4, scale=0), primary_key=True)
    exchange_pk = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('exchanges.exchange'), primary_key=True) # this doesnt work since Exchange has two primary keys

Here's what's happening:

My Exchange table has a composite primary key. This is required for my use case.

The PhoneNumber table I'm trying to define needs a ForeignKey to the Exchange table, but since the Exchange table has a composite primary key, I can't figure out how to make the relationship work.

Any guidance would be appreciated. Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
In your example, Exchange only has one primary key? Should the exchange column also be primary=True? –  shazow Mar 7 '13 at 0:46
    
Couple of things worth looking at: docs.sqlalchemy.org/en/latest/core/… stackoverflow.com/questions/10525797/… Also, what database are you using? –  shazow Mar 7 '13 at 1:03
    
Hi @shazow, you're right, I typo'ed there. Exchange has two primary keys. Also, I'm using PostgreSQL 9.2. –  rdegges Mar 7 '13 at 1:22
    
Can you clarify what you mean by "can't figure out how to make the relationship work"? What have you tried? Did you specify the foreign_keys in Relationship? Alternatively you can specify the primaryjoin condition. –  shazow Mar 8 '13 at 18:33
    
@rdegges: I've edited the question, regarding terminology. –  ypercube Mar 9 '13 at 20:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, after speaking with several great people on the sqlalchemy mailing list, I finally got the above problem figured out. Below is the final version of my code which allows me to relate properly between the tables:

class AreaCode(db.Model):
    __tablename__ = 'areacodes'

    area_code = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)


class Exchange(db.Model):
    __tablename__ = 'exchanges'

    exchange = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    area_code_pk = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('areacodes.area_code'),
                             primary_key=True)
    area_code = db.relationship('AreaCode', backref=db.backref('exchanges', lazy='dynamic'))


class PhoneNumber(db.Model):
    __tablename__ = 'phonenumbers'
    __table_args__ = (
        db.ForeignKeyConstraint(
            ['exchange_exchange', 'exchange_area_code_pk'],
            ['exchanges.exchange', 'exchanges.area_code_pk'],
        ),
    )

    phone_number = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    exchange_exchange = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    exchange_area_code_pk = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    exchange = db.relationship('Exchange', backref=db.backref('phone_numbers', lazy='dynamic'))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.