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I am trying to print my map to show both key and value for each print statement. I have duplicate keys and duplicate values. For example:

key -> value
house -> dog
house -> cat
dog -> house
dog -> cat
cat -> house
cat -> bike

This is my text file:

house   cat
house   dog
house   index
cat bike
cat house
cat index
dog house
dog cat
dog index

For some reason, my code is printing the string, "index" rather than the actual value. My code is here:

//adding values from a text file of two words per line.
//those two words per line in the text file are tab delimitted

public static Map<String, String> animals = new HashMap<String, String>(); 
BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader("animals.txt"));
String current_line;
String[] splitted_strings = new String[1];
while ((current_line = in.readLine()) != null){
   splitted_strings = current_line.split("\t");
   animals.put(splitted_strings[0], splitted_strings[1]);
}

//print statement
for(Map.Entry entry : animals.entrySet()) 
   System.out.println(entry.getValue() + " " + entry.getKey());

My output from simple print statements from my code shown below look like this:

index cat
index house
index dog

How can I add these values to a data structure to keep key pairs like above? How can I get the output to be this?:

house cat
house dog
house index
cat bike
cat house
cat index
dog house
dog cat
dog index
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1  
It is not printing "index" instead of the key, it is printing "index" for the value. Post the code you use to insert into the map. –  Omaha Mar 7 '13 at 0:39
1  
This seems like a very good case for an sscce –  Patricia Shanahan Mar 7 '13 at 0:42
    
You will never get that output with a HashMap. Keys are, by definition, unique. –  Aurand Mar 7 '13 at 0:46
    
@Aurand The program is printing value followed by key, so "index" is the value for every entry, and the printed keys are unique. –  Patricia Shanahan Mar 7 '13 at 1:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I have duplicate keys and duplicate values.

No you don't. Not in a Map<K,V>. The keys are unique by definition.

If you want multiple values per key, you need something like Guava's Multimap.

However, if the code you've presented is really printing "index" for every value, then I strongly suspect the map is incorrect to start with, and you've got a bug in your population code (which we can't see). (Either that, or you're using some custom class as the value and its toString method always returns "index".)

You should take a step back and look at your population code instead.

EDIT: I modified your sample code just enough so that it would compile, to come up with:

import java.io.*;
import java.util.*;

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {
        Map<String, String> animals = new HashMap<String, String>(); 
        BufferedReader in = new BufferedReader
            (new InputStreamReader(new FileInputStream("animals.txt")));
        String current_line;
        String[] splitted_strings = new String[1];
        while ((current_line = in.readLine()) != null){
            splitted_strings = current_line.split("\t");
            animals.put(splitted_strings[0], splitted_strings[1]);
        }
        for(Map.Entry entry : animals.entrySet()) 
            System.out.println(entry.getValue() + " " + entry.getKey());
    }
}

And with animals.txt of:

key1    value1
key2    value2
key3    value3
key4    value4

The output was:

value4 key4
value3 key3
value2 key2
value1 key1

No sign of "index" at all. So either that isn't your real population code (besides the compilation error), or your text file has "index" for every value...

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Jon, I've added the population code. Thanks for your quick reply! –  Stephen D Mar 7 '13 at 0:43
    
@StephenD: And your file looks like...? –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '13 at 0:51
    
@StephenD: That population code doesn't even compile - there's no InputStreamReader constructor taking a String filename. –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '13 at 0:53
    
I really can't post my text file. Its 4,726,878 lines of pairs. In the file, there is at least 100 identical keys per word on the left, and at least 100 identical values per word on the right, which makes up the almost 5 million pairs. –  Stephen D Mar 7 '13 at 0:59
2  
@StephenD: Your file shows exactly what I described: "My guess is that you've got the value "index" as the last value in the file for each key." Yes, as we've now said multiple times, Map is the wrong data structure for you. Look at Multimap in Guava, as linked in the answer. –  Jon Skeet Mar 7 '13 at 2:09

As an alternative to using Guava, you can roll your own multimap based on Map<String,Set<String>>.

When adding a key-value pair, first check whether the key is already present. If not, put it with a Set containing only the new value. If the key is already present, get its Set and add the new value.

To check whether a pair exists, get the Set for the key and see if it contains the value.

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